Volume II Issue XI

Publication for Volume-2 Issue-11, November 2018 is in-process ..

Spatial Distribution Patterns of Population Change for development in Sri Lanka with special reference to Mortality & Fertility (1992 – 2010) by using GIS

M.R.N.S. Sumanapala – November 2018 Page No.: 01-03

The population change refers to change in the number of people during the specific time. The world population has not been stable. It has increased manifold. Mortality and Fertility are the key indicators which say about the development of specific country or a region. Sri Lanka has experienced the changes in the context of population with the fluctuating level of Fertility (birth rate) and Mortality (death rate) which had on previous years. Main reason is development in regional wise.
The Study main objectives are identification of Spatial Distribution of Crude Death Rate (CDR) (1992-2010) and Crude Birth Rate (CBR) in Sri Lanka (1992 -2010). Actually this study is focused on that changes as spatial variation to show mapping work by using Geographic Information systems. Mainly this study is based on Secondary Data which gathered around 1992-2010 from, Department of Census & Statistics in Sri Lanka, Annual Health Statistics, Central Bank reports and Necessary web pages. Statistically calculated Data were entered to the GIS application. Under that, Sri Lanka District Shape File was used to show the Spatial Variation of Population change in year wise. Added Data were symbolized according to the given ranges such as, Very Low, Low, High and Very High. Data were presented mainly by using Choropleth Maps which prepared by GIS. Tables were used to present the data effectively.
Results were shown as the pattern of both mortality and fertility component were changed from 1992 – 2010 according to CDR and CBR. Especially in the case of CDR Anuradhapura, Polonnaruwa and Nuwaraeliya District has significant distribution from 1992 to 2010. It means CDR were very high level category in 1992 but it reached to low level category to 2010. Advancement of health sector, Education development and high amount of Migration rate can be a cause for this significant change. Colombo and the Hambantota are the districts which shown in same distribution in CDR from 1992 to 2010. No any spatial variation. The reason is according to geographical features all the services are pointed to the Colombo city and it results high population rate from 1992 to2010. Because majority of labor force are gathered around Colombo means western province in the country. The case of Hambantota is that people who living in the district is nominated as villages they are so isolated than others. Most of people are engaging with Chena cultivation and Paddy field works. In the context of CBR, Polonnaruwa and Nuwaraeliya District also shown significant spatial distribution from 1992 to 2010. Regional development acted for this variation among population.

Page(s): 01-03                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 13 November 2018

 M.R.N.S. Sumanapala
Road Development Authority

[1]. Abeykoon, A.P.T.L. 1998. Population and Manpower Resources of Sri Lanka. Colombo 7: Natural Resources, Energy and Science Authority of Sri Lanka. p. 8-9
[2]. Annual Health Statistics Sri Lanka, 2005 -2010, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SERVICES MINISTRY OF HEALTHCARE AND NUTRITION SRI LANKA.
[3]. Chandna, R.C. 1998. Population. New Delhi: Kalyani Publishers. P. 50-65
[4]. www.statistics.gov.lk
[5]. www.cbsl.gov.lk

M.R.N.S. Sumanapala “Spatial Distribution Patterns of Population Change for development in Sri Lanka with special reference to Mortality & Fertility (1992 – 2010) by using GIS” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.2 issue 11, pp.01-03 November 2018  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-2-issue-11/01-03.pdf

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Nigerian State and Development in the Niger Delta: A Critique of the Niger Delta Development Commission (NDDC)

Ekekwe, Eme N., Ph.D., Ukachikara, Ucheoma O. – November 2018 Page No.: 04-13

Nigeria’s Niger Delta has a disreputable history of poor living conditions despite its rich human and natural resources. Since the findings of the Willink’s Commission in 1957, the precarious development condition of the region has continued to be poorly addressed, oversixty years after. Various development interventions have been made by the Nigerian state supposedly to tackle the development conundrum of the region. Latest of such programmes is the Niger Delta Development Commission established in 2000. Despite this latest effort, the Niger Delta continues to be trapped in the vicious circle of underdevelopment. Given that many factors may be responsible for the failure of the Commission and its inability to facilitate development in the region, this study attempted an interrogation of the impacts of the character of Nigerian state on the poor performance of the NDDC, and by implication, other such interventions in the area. Marxian Political Economy was adopted as the theoretical framework for this study. Data collected from secondary and primary sources were analysed using the Content Analysis method. It was found that the abysmal performance of the Niger Delta Development Commission (NDDC) in the development of Niger Delta could be safely attributed to the nature of the Nigerian state. The Commission failed to facilitate development in the region because it was not structured to do so. It was conceived and designed as an avenue for creating the order in which the interest of the ruling class to accumulate capital in the region is favoured and protected. The study therefore recommended that the NDDC legal framework be reviewed to accommodate such people-centred provisions as making membership of the management and governing boards of the NDDC a community elective affair, as well as making the advisory and monitoring committee of the NDDC independent bodies composed of members of the local communities.

Page(s): 04-13                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 14 November 2018

 Ekekwe, Eme N., Ph.D.
Department of Political & Administrative Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria

 Ukachikara, Ucheoma O.
Department of Political & Administrative Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria

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[23]. Ohale, L. (2018) Poverty in the Midst of Plenty: The Paradox of Nigeria’s Development. University of Port Harcourt Inaugural Lecture Series No. 145. Port Harcourt: University of Port Harcourt Press.
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Ekekwe, Eme N., Ph.D., Ukachikara, Ucheoma O. ” Nigerian State and Development in the Niger Delta: A Critique of the Niger Delta Development Commission (NDDC)” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.2 issue 11, pp.04-13 November 2018  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-2-issue-11/04-13.pdf

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Combating International Terrorism & Torture on Suspected Terrorists in the Form of ‘Enhanced Interrogation Techniques’: Is It Justified Under IHL & IL Discourse
Nighat Nazir – November 2018 – Page No.: 14-28

U.S. counterterrorism operations are being carried out on an unprecedented scale. After the terrorist attacks of 9/11, the US administration declared a worldwide war on terrorism, involving open and covert military operations, new security legislation, efforts to block the financing of terrorism, and more. Criticism of the ‘War on Terror’ addresses the moral grounds, fiscal efficiency as well as other issues pertaining to the war. Even the phrase ‘War on Terror’ itself is labeled as a misnomer. The notion of war has proven highly contentious, with critics charging that participating States exploited it to pursue long-standing policy and military objectives and jeopardize civil liberties, thereby violating obligations under the Geneva Conventions and other international instruments. The U.S government is accused of deliberately choosing Guantánamo as its prison place because it believes that foreign citizens detained there will be outside the domain of U.S. law and international obligations under various international instruments. The Article will narrate the basic concept of torture and its prohibition under international law. It also highlights the enhanced interrogation techniques used by CIA on the detainees, though the US Government banned these techniques 10 years ago. It will also demonstrate that utilitarianism does not support the use of torture in any circumstances, not only because another method of interrogation is more effective, but also because the practice of interrogational torture undermines individual security. Finally, it concludes that utilitarianism demands the absolute prohibition of torture. A detailed analysis of the International law and international human rights instruments expounds that the US must provide fair trials in Courts to all terrorism suspects, ensure accountability of any violation of human rights and bring all national security policies in line with its obligations under International law.

Page(s): 14-28                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 14 November 2018

 Nighat Nazir
Law Department, International Islamic University Islamabad, Pakistan

References are not Available.

Nighat Nazir “Combating International Terrorism & Torture on Suspected Terrorists in the Form of ‘Enhanced Interrogation Techniques’: Is It Justified Under IHL & IL Discourse” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.2 issue 11, pp.14-28 November 2018 URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-2-issue-11/14-28.pdf

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Headteachers’ Management Styles and Secondary School Students’ Discipline in Wakiso District, Uganda

Dr. Kayindu Vincent – November 2018 Page No.: 29-32

The current study was carried out in 25 private secondary schools, randomly selected from five sub counties in Wakiso district which boarders Kampala City the capital of Uganda. It examined the relationship between head teachers’ dominant management styles and students’ discipline. Using cross-sectional survey design with a quantitative approach, the data was collected from 725 respondents, 700 of whom were students and 25 were head teachers. The findings indicated that head teachers’ dominantly used management styles do not correlate significantly with the discipline of students. The general conclusion made was that all head teachers use different management style in the execution of their duties; the method which is dominantly used by the head teachers does not influence the discipline of the learners much. Thus, the researcher recommended that since other factors other than the headteachers’ management styles mainly impact on the students’ discipline, parents should try their best to ensure that they close the social, environmental and economic gaps which can be detrimental to their children.

Page(s): 29-32                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 15 November 2018

 Dr. Kayindu Vincent
Kampala International University, Uganda, East Africa

[1]. Bwire, P. (2017). The socio economic impacts of university students’ strikes in Kampala district. Unpublished MED dissertation Kampala International University.KIU.
[2]. Byaruhanga, M. (2004). Head teachers’ Leadership behavior and students’ behavior in Government aided secondary schools in Kabarole district of Uganda.Unpublished MED-Educational Management and Administration dissertation, Makerere University, Uganda.
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[15]. Ssekamwa, J. (1999). History of education in East Africa.Kampala: Longman

Dr. Kayindu Vincent “Headteachers’ Management Styles and Secondary School Students’ Discipline in Wakiso District, Uganda” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.2 issue 11, pp.29-32 November 2018  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-2-issue-11/29-32.pdf

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Divorce and Islamic Law of Inheritance: A Comparative Analysis of the Position of Divorcee

Dr. Muntaka Yahaya Aminu – November 2018 Page No.: 33-39

Islam emphasizes on family maintenance. Divorce is the worst profitable in Islam but it is allowed if life is hard for couples because of their conflicts. Islam advices divorce and sometimes it is obligatory for a family is codified and detailed rules. Islam considered the rights and position of divorcee to inheritance and provides some conditions and rules concerning it. This paper deals with three sections; first section, discusses issues such as meaning of marriage, divorce, its types, conditions and others. Second section deals with inheritance such as pillars of inheritance, conditions, sources among others. In the third section of the paper it highlights and analyses the position of divorcee in Islamic law of inheritance with emphasis to the views of some scholars. The method used in the paper in data collection is analytical.

Page(s): 33-39                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 15 November 2018

 Dr. Muntaka Yahaya Aminu
Department of Islamic Studies, Faculty of Arts and Islamic Studies, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria

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Dr. Muntaka Yahaya Aminu “Divorce and Islamic Law of Inheritance: A Comparative Analysis of the Position of Divorcee” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.2 issue 11, pp.33-39 November 2018  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-2-issue-11/33-39.pdf

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Optimal Monetary Policy Instrument in Setting Monetary Policy Reaction Function in Nigeria

Ibrahim Umar Bambale, Abubakar Isah Funtua – November 2018 Page No.: 40-45

This paper sets out to ascertain the performance of alternative monetary policy instruments in setting monetary policy reaction function in Nigeria and, in the process identify whether setting monetary policy reaction function using the interest rate as the policy instrument is superior to setting monetary policy reaction function using the money growth rate as the policy instrument in Nigeria. To achieve this objective, the performance of the alternative specifications in setting monetary policy reaction function is considered following three types of shocks the economy is historically susceptible to for comparative purpose. This is done using a calibrated small open-economy New Keynesian Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium (DSGE) model of the Nigerian Economy. Within this framework, the alternative specifications are ranked based on the results of social welfare loss. The study shows that 1.3279 is the minimum welfare loss result of setting monetary policy reaction function using the interest rate as the policy instrument, compared with 1.02 minimum welfare loss result of setting monetary policy reaction function using the money growth rate as the policy instrument. The paper concludes that using the money growth rate option is welfare superior to using the interest rate option in Nigeria. Therefore, the result suggests that Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) should consider using money growth rate in setting monetary policy reaction function, which is consistent with anti-inflationary policies.

Page(s): 40-45                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 21 November 2018

 Ibrahim Umar Bambale
Department of Economic, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria

 Abubakar Isah Funtua
Department of Economics & Development Studies, Federal University, Dutsin-Ma, Nigeria

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Ibrahim Umar Bambale, Abubakar Isah Funtua “Optimal Monetary Policy Instrument in Setting Monetary Policy Reaction Function in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.2 issue 11, pp.40-45 November 2018  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-2-issue-11/40-45.pdf

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Treatment Programs in Preventing with Drug Addiction

Dr. Asbah Razali – November 2018 Page No.: 46-50

Addicts who are not sincere or dedicated to change for the better would face a difficult time in rehab. Therefore, the individual’s own motivation and desire for change is vital in making the treatment a success and to prevent a relapse from occurring. It is for the best that the family members do not abandon the former drug addict would try to go astray. If so, the government should look at the skills and training to support the family as a group. People may not be so concerned with what happened, but the role of the family concerned should be supported and given the necessary exposure. While addicts difficult to change, at least a family member who is aware can help control and give sympathy to the addicts to get out of this situation. It is under the responsibility of the family members to guide the ex addict. This paper outlines the many programs of the treatment such as family support programs, treatment programs, and maintenance and relapse programs.

Page(s): 46-50                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 23 November 2018

 Dr. Asbah Razali
Senior Lecturer, Department of Anthropology and Sociology, University of Malaya, Malaysia

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[2]. Stone, A. L. Becker, L. G. Huber, A. M. and Catalano, R. F. (2012) Review of Risk and Protective Factors of Substance Use and Problem Use in Emerging Adulthood. Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 37, pp. 747-775
[3]. Lander, L., Howsare, J. & Bryne, M. (2013). The Impact of Substance Use Disorders on Families and Children: From Theory to Practice. Social work Public Health, 28 (0), 194-205.
[4]. Copello, A. Templeton, L. and Vellman, R. (2006) Family Interventions for Drug and Alcohol Misuse: Is There a Best Practice? Current Opinion in Psychiatry, Vol. 19, pp. 271-276.
[5]. Kleber, H.D. (1996). Outpatient Detoxification from Opiates. Primary Psychiatry . 1:42-52.
[6]. Lewis, B.F., McCusker, J., Hindin, R., Frost, R. and Garfield, F. (1993). Four residential drug treatment programs: Project IMPACT, In: J.A. Inciardi, F.M.Jims, and B.W. Fetcher (eds), Innovative Approaches in the Treatment of Drug Abuse, Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, pp. 45-60.
[7]. Sullivan, C.J., Mekendrick, K., K. Sacks, S., and Banks, S.M. (2007). Modified Therapeutic Community for Offenders with MCA disorders: Substance use outcomes. American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse 33 (6): 823-832.

Works Cited from Website:

[1]. World Health Organization. (2018). Substance abuse. Retrieved from http://www.who.int/topics/substance_abuse/en/
[2]. O’Leary, M. (2009) Intimidation of Families. Family Support Network. Available at http://www.fsn.ie/research/documents/IntimidationofFamilies_000.pdf accessed September 8th 2018
[3]. Relapse Treatment. (n.d.). Retrieved October 2, 2018, from https://www.caron.org/our programs/inpatient-treatment/relapse-treatment
[4]. National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). (2018). Types of treatment programs. Retrieved from https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/principles-drug-addiction-treatment-research-based-guide-third-edition/drug-addiction-treatment-in-united-states/types-treatment-programs

Dr. Asbah Razali “Treatment Programs in Preventing with Drug Addiction” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.2 issue 11, pp.46-50 November 2018  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-2-issue-11/46-50.pdf

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The Legal and Policy Frameworks on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) Mechanism in Nigeria

Dr. B. Christopher Hia – November 2018 Page No.: 51-56

The Nigerian ecosystem and biodiversity are threatened by climate change as a result of anthropogenic factors like lumbering, logging, felling of trees with attendant consequences. Other factors that have deleterious impacts on the ecosystem include: desertification, drought, overgrazing and over exploitation of marginal lands. There are series of international legal instruments on climate change that have been ratified by Nigeria, such as; United Nations Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), 1992, the United Nations Convention on Biodiversity (UNCBD), 1992, the Kyoto Protocol, 1997 and the Paris Agreement on Climate Change, 2015 among others. All these instruments recognised the fact that deforestation and environmental degradation have negative impacts on the ecosystem and that Reducing Emission from Deforestation and Forest Degradation plus Conservation, Sustainable Management of Forests and Enhancement of Forests Stocks (REDD+) can reduce these impacts of climate change as well as promote adaptation and mitigation in developing countries like Nigeria. Apart from ratifying some of these treaties, Nigeria has participated in climate change negotiations and has submitted its first and second communications in 2003 and 2014 respectively to the UNFCCC and her Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDC) to the Paris Agreement on Climate Change in 2014. There are existing laws and policies on forestry and conservation such a the Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, 1999 (as amended), the National Environmental Standards and Regulations (NESREA) Act, 2007, the National Parks Act, 2004 and the Endangered Species Act, 2004. There are also forestry laws and policies in the thirty six states of the federation and Abuja the Federal Capital Territory aimed at minimising deforestation and desertification in Nigeria.
The effective implementation of these laws and policies at the federal, states and local government levels in Nigeria are hampered by legal and policy hurdles stemming from obsolete laws, land tenure issues, lack of capacity, finance, technology and the political will to implement REDD+ in Nigeria. It is strongly recommended that Nigeria should amend and harmonise her existing laws and policies on REDD+ in line with international reality.

Page(s): 51-56                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 24 November 2018

 Dr. B. Christopher Hia
PhD (BSU) Makurdi, LLM, LLB, BL, PGDE (NTI) Kaduna, UNITAR, Geneva, Switzerland Certificate of Completion; Massive Open Online Course on National Adaptation Plans: Climate Resilience in Agriculture, November-December, 2017, Specialized Module on Climate Change and Cities January, 2018, Specialized Module on Children and Climate Change February, 2018. Lecturer Faculty of Law, National Open University of Nigeria (NOUN) Lagos, Barrister and Solicitor of the Supreme Court of Nigeria, and Fellow, Institute of Corporate Administration of Nigeria. Former Commissioner Benue State Independent Electoral Commission (BSIEC).

Reference are not Available.

Dr. B. Christopher Hia “The Legal and Policy Frameworks on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) Mechanism in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.2 issue 11, pp.51-56 November 2018  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-2-issue-11/51-56.pdf

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An Analysis of the Contents of Section Ten (On The Issues of Reminding and Exhortations) from The Manuscript Titled “Unveiling The Standard Practice From What It is Not (Among The Views of Scholars) On Ten Important Issues.” By Shaykh Uthman bn Foduye

Dr. Aminu Alhaji Bala, Dr. Hamza A. Ainu – November 2018 Page No.: 57-62

This article is an analysis of the contents of section ten (on the issues of reminding and exhortations) from the manuscript titled “Unveiling the standard practice from what it is not (among the views of scholars) on ten important issues,” written by Shaykh Uthman bn Foduye. The manuscript was written in Arabic language in the 17th century by a well known reformer of Hausa land. We therefore intend to highlight a section from its contents in English language for the benefit of English readers who may find Arabic language difficult to understand and also to the contemporary Da’wah scholars who do not know much about Shaykh Uthman bn Foduye and his writings. The manuscript is also useful for teachers and students of Islamic studies. The manuscript is divided into ten sections as follows: First issue: on aspect of belief both hidden and manifest. Second issue: On the authenticity of devotion without knowing what is obligatory from what is not (i.e. mandub, mubah, Sunnan and recommended acts) Third issue: On the exegesis of the Qur’an. Fourth issue: On the narration of Hadith. Fifth issue: On issues of publishing. Sixth issue: On the command to write down Hadith and other sciences. Seventh issue: On the issue of learning what exceed personal obligations. Eighth issue: On legal verdict. Ninth issue: On debate. Tenth issue: On reminding and exhortation. This article contained an analysis of what is contained in the tenth issue on reminding and exhortations. It is a very good work for all da’wah scholars and workers.

Page(s): 57-62                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 23 November 2018

 Dr. Aminu Alhaji Bala
Department of Islamic Studies, Faculty of Arts and Islamic Studies, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria

 Dr. Hamza A. Ainu
Centre for Hausa Studies, Usman Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria

[1]. The hadith is fabricated as stated in al-dhaifah of al-Bani: No 3069.
[2]. See, Ahmad bn Muhammad al-Haytamiy, al-Zawājir an iqtiraf al-kaba’ir, Dar al-fikr, Lebanon, 1987/1407
[3]. M. M. Khan, The Translation of the meanings of Sahih Al-Bukhari, Dar Al-Arabia, Lebanon, Vol. 1. Hadih No. 68. P. 130 .
[4]. See, Ahmad bn Muhammad al-Haytamiy, al-Zawājir an iqtiraf al-kaba’ir, Dar al-fikr, Lebanon, 1987/1407
[5]. See, Ahmad bn Muhammad al-Haytamiy, al-Zawājir an iqtiraf al-kaba’ir, Dar al-fikr, Lebanon, 1987/1407

[6]. See, Ahmad bn Muhammad al-Haytamiy, al-Zawājir an Iqtiraf al-kaba’ir, Dar al-fikr, Lebanon, 1987/1407
[7]. See, Abu Hamid al-Ghazali, Ihya’ Ulum al-Din, Beirut: Dar al-Marifah
[8]. See, Abu Hamid al-Ghazali, Ihya’ Ulum al-Din, Beirut: Dar al-Marifah
[9]. Imam Muslim, Sahih Muslim, Trans. by Abdul-Hamid Siddiqi, Dar Al-Arabia publishers, Beirut, Lebanon, Vol. 1, Hadith No. 79, p. 81.

Dr. Aminu Alhaji Bala, Dr. Hamza A. Ainu “An Analysis of the Contents of Section Ten (On The Issues of Reminding and Exhortations) from The Manuscript Titled “Unveiling The Standard Practice From What It is Not (Among The Views of Scholars) On Ten Important Issues.” By Shaykh Uthman bn Foduye” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.2 issue 11, pp.57-62 November 2018  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-2-issue-11/57-62.pdf

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A Study on the Necessity of the Utilization of the New Managerial Concepts for the Increased Productivity of the Televising News Room

Gunasekara, H.D.E. – November 2018 Page No.: 63-65

It has become timely necessity to utilise new management concepts to increase the productivity of the television news room. New managerial concepts such as Planning, organizing, administration, leadership, motivation, assessments and encouragements, brain storming discussions, performance review and feedback are being used fully in the news sections of the developed world. Do the television news managers of Sri Lanka utilise the new managerial concepts productively? If yes, how?. Inquiring the effects of the new managerial concepts on the productivity of the television news room is the aim of the research. The television news managers of Sri Lanka do not utilise the new managerial concepts effectively is the Hypothesis of the research. Interview method and participatory observation are the 2 main Primary data gathering methods. Planning reports, progress reports, annual reports, copies of news, shift duty roster and other files of the 6 television news rooms including documents pertaining to the subject are the secondary data gathering methods. Amongst the multiple local media Only 6 television news rooms were selected for the research while the research focused only on the new managerial concept out of the broad subject area in the management. 5 out of 6 television news rooms studied did not utilise new managerial concepts productively as a whole. It is 83.33%. Many news managers has turned to imitate international news channels and do not adhere to due managerial procedure in recruitment for news section. Manager concentrates only on the outside training. They don’t even follow an assessment procedure as per accepted managerial rules. All the news managers agreed on the quality of the news it was revealed that there are internal issues on it. Confirming the hypothesis, Main conclusion was that the news section of the local televisions do not utilise the new managerial concepts productively. To offer better quality news the rough Television media, Television news managers should utilise new managerial concepts. It will lead for effective and productive activities in the television news section.

Page(s): 63-65                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 24 November 2018

 Gunasekara, H.D.E.
Sri Lanka Broadcasting Corporation

 Dr Carol Murphy
School of Education, University of Tasmania, Australia

[1]. Bergin, Francis J:- Practical Communication ELBS /pitman second Edition, CAS (1981)
[2]. Dennis, E :- Understanding Mass communication, 1994, HoughttionMiffin Company, Boston
[3]. Herbert John, Journalism in the digitalage – Theory & Practice for Broadcast, print and online media, 2001, focal Press, oxford
[4]. Lambert, A:- British Broadcasting, 1977, Routledge, London
[5]. Mencher, Meioin:- Basic News Writing, 1990, Universal Book Stall, New Delhi

Gunasekara, H.D.E. “Diverse Mass Media as Teaching Resources in Culturally Diverse English Classrooms (CDEC)” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.2 issue 11, pp.63-65 November 2018  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-2-issue-11/63-65.pdf

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Akoko Resistance to External Invasion and Domination in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

Johnson Olaosebikan Aremu, Solomon Oluwasola Afolabi – November 2018 Page No.: 66-72

This study examined the nature of Akoko response to external invasion and domination by some neighbouring and distant Nigerian groups and communities in the 19th and 20th Centuries. Data for the study was obtained from primary and secondary sources and were analysed using qualitative methods of analysis. The primary sources are archival materials and oral interviews with informants who were purposively selected due to their perceived knowledge about the subject of study. Secondary sources included relevant textbooks, journal articles, thesis, dissertations and long essays, some periodicals and internet materials. It noted that Akoko communities were invaded severally by some of their immediate neighbours like Owo; Ado-Ekiti and Ikole- Ekiti between the 15th and 18th centuries; as well as some imperial lords from Benin, Nupe and Ibadan in the 19th and 20th centuries. It found out that these incessant invasions were due largely to the search for political hegemony; demand for slaves and for personal aggrandizement of some soldiers. The paper noted further that, in spite of their limited population, the Akoko people fought vehemently for survival as a people and eventually maintained their self identity and succeeded in shaking off the yoke of their imperialist powers. The paper highlights the various strategies adopted by the Akokos in their quest for survival and emancipation. It concluded that unity of purpose and total commitment to collective survival as a people were at the heart of their success story against external domination and subjugation.

Page(s): 66-72                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 25 November 2018

 Johnson Olaosebikan Aremu
Ph.D, Department of History and International Studies, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, P.M.B. 5363, Ado- Ekiti, Nigeria.

 Solomon Oluwasola Afolabi
Ph.D, Registry Department, Ekiti State University, Ado – Ekiti, Nigeria

[1]. O.B. Olaoba, “The Traditional Judicial Organisation and Procedure in Ekiti Palaces, 1830-1930”, (Ph.D Thesis, University of Ibadan, Institute of African Studies,1992), p.1.
[2]. See A.Olukoju, “Colonial Taxation and its Socio-Political Impact in Akokoland, 1900-1930”, In Ade Obayemi (ed.), Northeast Yorubaland: Studies in History and Culture of a Frontier Zone.
[3]. C.A.Odunletola, “History of Ogbagi and Irun as Frontier Communities Between Akoko and Ekiti”, (Long-Essay, Department of History, Ondo State University, Ado-Ekiti,1987), p.2.
[4]. F.O. Saba, “The Traditional Patterns of Relationship Among Akoko City-States in the Pre-Colonial Time”, (Long-Essay, Department of History, Ondo State University, Ado-Ekiti, June, 1987), p.8.
[5]. J.A. Atanda, An introduction to Yoruba History (Ibadan, Ibadan University press, 1980), p.18.
[6]. N.A.I.CSO/26/1966) Intelligence Report on Akoko, Owo Division, 1933, p.7
[7]. NAK, Report on Kabba Division, 1912. Loko Prof. p.26
[8]. N.A.I. C.S.O/26/1966. Intelligence Report on Akoko, Owo Division, 1933, p.7
[9]. See Report of the 1963 Population Census
[10]. S.A. Akintoye, Revolution and power politics in Yorubaland, 1840 – 1893, (London, Longman, 1977), p.5.
[11]. N.A.I. C.S.O/26/1966. Intelligence Report on Akoko, Owo Division, 1933.
[12]. Ibid
[13]. See G.O. Olusanya “Forward” in Abeokuta, Home of the Egba. Vol. 1, 1985, p.5. see also T. Falola and G.O. Olusanya, “Modern Nigeria: A Synthesis”, in T. Falola (ed.) Modern Nigeria: A Tribute to G.O. Olusanya p.4
[14]. J.H. Beeley, Intelligence Report on Akoko, N.A.I.C. SO25, 29667, Vol 1, 1934. P.20
[15]. J.U.Egharevba. Short History of Benin, (Ibadan, University Press, 1960) p.85
[16]. J.H. Beeley, Intelligence Report on Akoko, N.A.I.C. SO25, 29667, Vol 1, 1934. P.34 – 35
[17]. Ibid
[18]. Ibid; Interview with Mr Adeusi Bamisilo, 90yrs, No. 19, Ada Street, Ogbagi Akoko, 11 December, 2016.
[19]. I.Olomola, Ekitiparapo Aspirations Since 1890s, (Ile-Ife, Andkolad Press, 2005), p.70.
[20]. S.A. Akintoye, Revolution and power politics in Yorubaland, 1840 – 1893, (London, Longman, 1977), p.25.
[21]. See details in C.O. Akomolafe, “The Establishment of British Administration and its Impact on Owo-Akoko Relations, 1919-1935”, JHSN, 10/I, 1979). p.68.
[22]. R.T.Akinyele, “The Yoruba of Kabba Province and State Creation”, In Ade Obayemi (ed.), Northeast Yorubaland: Study in the History and Culture of a Frontier Zone. p.16’
[23]. C.O.Komolaf. the Establishment of British Administration and its Impact on Owo – Akoko Relations, 1919 – 1935 (J.H.S.N. (10/1/)) Dec. 1979. P67
[24]. S.A. Akintoye, Revolution and Power Politics……..p.31
[25]. Ibid
[26]. S.A.Akintoye, “The North Eastern Yoruba Districts and the Benin Kingdom”, JHSN, Vol.4, June 1969). See also C.O.Komolafe, “The District Head System in Akoko, 1914-1935”, ODU, Journal of West Africa Studies, Series 18, July, 1978) p.27.
[27]. A.Oguntuyi; The History of Ado-Ekiti, Part 2. (Ado-Ekiti, Bamigboye Press, 1978). p.77.
[28]. Ibid
[29]. S.A. Akintoye, Revolution and power politics in Yorubaland, 1840 – 1893, (London, Longman, 1977).
[30]. Ibid.
[31]. S.A. Akintoye, Revolution and power politics in Yorubaland, 1840 – 1893, (London, Longman, 1977), p.26.
[32]. O.Ikimi (ed.), Groundwork of Nigerian History (Ibadan, Heinemann, 1980)
[33]. See E. Elphinstone: The Gazetteer of Ilorin Province. P.39
[34]. J.T.Flint; Sir George Goldier and the Making of Nigera (London, 1966) p.89
[35]. A. Obayemi (ed.), Northeast Yorubaland: Studies in the History and Culture of a Frontier zone, p.146.
[36]. S.O. Biobaku: Egba and their Neighbours
[37]. S.A. Akintoye, Revolution and power politics in Yorubaland, 1840 – 1893 (London, Longman, 1977), p.50.
[38]. Ibid p.50
[39]. I.S. Jimada, The Nupe and the Origin and Evolution of Yoruba 1275 – 1879, (Kaduna, Baraka Press), p.100.
[40]. S.A. Akintoye, Revolution and power politics in Yorubaland, 1840 – 1893. (London, Longman, 1977), p.51.
[41]. D.O. Asabia and J.O. Adegbesan, Ido-Ani past and present. (Ibadan, Ibadan University press), p.16.
[42]. W.Rodney, How Europe Underdeveloped Africa (Abuja, Panaf Publishers, 2009) p.2
[43]. J.F.Ade-Ajayi, and R. Smith, Yoruba Warfare in the 19th Century, (Ibadan, University Press, 1977) p.69,
[44]. J.D. Fage, Introduction to the History of West Africa (Cambridge, University Press, 1954), p.91.
[45]. J,F,Ade-Ajayi and R.Smith, Yoruba Warfare……..p.68.
[46]. I.Olomola, “The Yoruba and their Neighbours” in Deji Ogunremi and B. Adediran (eds.), Culture and Society in Yorubaland, (Ibadan, Rex Charles Publication 1998) p.75.
[47]. Ibid.
[48]. C.A. Odunletola, “A History of Ogbagi and Irun as Frontier Communities Between Akoko and Ekiti” Long Essay submitted to Ondo State University, Ado – Ekiti, June 1987. P.6
[49]. Ibid
[50]. S.A. Akintoye, Revolution and power politics in Yorubaland, 1840 – 1893. (London, Longman, 1977) p.91
[51]. Z.O. Apata; “The Nupe Imperialism and the Ogidi Grand Alliance, 1894 – 1897: Reflections of Ekitiparapo war”, In A. Akinjogbin (ed,), War and Peace in Yorubaland, 1793 – 1893, (Ibadan, Heinemann, 1998), p.435
[52]. Ibid
[53]. I.S. Jimada, The Nupe and the Origin and Evolution of Yoruba 1275 – 1879 (Kaduna, Baraka Press) p.104
[54]. S.A. Akintoye, Revolution and power politics in Yorubaland, 1840 – 1893. (London, Longman, 1977) p.50
[55]. Z.O. Apata; “The Nupe Imperialism and the Ogidi Grand Alliance, 1894 – 1897: Reflections of Ekitiparapo war” In A. Akinjogbin (ed.), War and Peace in Yorubaland, 1793 – 1893 (Ibadan, Heinemann, 1998) p.437
[56]. Ayodeji Olukoju, “Colonial Taxation and its socio – Economic Impact in Akokoland, 1900 – 1930. In A. bayemi (ed) Northeast Yorubaland: Studies in History and Culture of a Frontier zone p.146
[57]. For details of Ogun-Alapopo in which Irun attacked Ogbagi for her alliance with Ibadan against Akoko, see C,A,Odunletola, History of Ogbagi and Irun…pp.23-25
[58]. Ayodeji Olukoju, “Colonial Taxation and its socio – Economic Impact in Akokoland 1900 – 1930”, In A. bayemi (ed) Northeast Yorubaland: Studies in History and Culture of a Frontier zone
[59]. S.A. Akintoye, Revolution and power politics in Yorubaland, 1840 – 1893 (London, Longman, 1977). p.69.
[60]. For example I.S. Jimada postulates that Owa – Ale …… his throne the Olukare who possibly might have been of Nupe Origin or having strong ties with Nupe see p.102
[61]. S.A. Akintoye, Revolution and power politics in Yorubaland, 1840 – 1893. (London, Longman, 1977) p.55.
[62]. See O. Temple; Notes on the Tribes, Provinces, Emirates and States of the Northern Provinces of Nigeria (C.L. Temple (ed) Capetown, 1919) p.7.
[63]. Z.O. Apata notes that the Ogba tax and tribute collector imposed on Akoko and Ijumu sometimes demand for children and wives as form of taxation. P.435

Johnson Olaosebikan Aremu, Solomon Oluwasola Afolabi “Akoko Resistance to External Invasion and Domination in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.2 issue 11, pp.66-72 November 2018  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-2-issue-11/66-72.pdf

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Spatial Analysis of Sanitation Facilities in Ado Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria

Adeniyi Joshua .Olu and Odogiyon Agunloye.H – November 2018 Page No.: 73-79

This work examined and analyzed sanitation facilities in residential districts of Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria. All the existing sanitation facilities in the study area were identified; Information and data were obtained directly from the targeted population using structured questionnaire. The questions provided in the questionnaire were directed to the household population in the area. Some of the variables considered are; types of toilet facilities used in the study area, anal cleaning materials, hand washing with soap, distance between well/borehole and leaching field/pit latrine, and interest in using improved sanitation facilities if provided.For the purpose of this research, multi-stage sampling techniquewas adopted in the administration of questionnaire on residents of the three residential zones in Ado-Ekiti.The targeted household population in the study area was thirty seven thousand four hundred and nineteen. (37419) and the sample size is 1.5% which translates to five hundred and twenty six (526) this becomes the total number of questionnaire administered for the study.Findings revealed high number of households using improved sanitation facilities; the analysis also indicate that, there are still some households who use bush and pit latrine without slab. The paper recommends among other things, that Ekiti State should evolve a well articulate policy that willenhance partnership with Federal Government and International Development Agencies to improve public health and sanitation.

Page(s): 73-79                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 25 November 2018

 Adeniyi Joshua .Olu
Department of Urban & Regional Planning Rufus Giwa Polytechnic, Owo, Ondo State, Nigeria.

 Odogiyon Agunloye.H
Department of Urban & Regional Planning Rufus Giwa Polytechnic, Owo, Ondo State, Nigeria.

[1]. Adebiyi J.K. (2016); contemporary concepts in physical planning.Vol.1. pg 329-346.Gbolagade commercial press. Ibadan, Nigeria.
[2]. Bartone C.R, Bernstein J. and Leith Mann J. (2006); Towards Environmental Strategies for cities: Policy Considerations for urban environmental management in developing countries. Biblioteca virtual emsaude.
[3]. Center for Disease Control and Prevention (2009); U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.HHS/ Open. 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA. 30329-4027 USA.
[4]. Harry Jones (2009); Equity in Development. Overseas Development Institute, 111 Westminster Bridge Road, London SE17Jd. www.odi.org.uk
[5]. National Population Commission (1991); Census ’91 Final ‘Result: Ondo State.
[6]. Olajuyigbe, A.E (2007); Evaluation of Domestic Water Needs for a Rapidly Urbanized Medium size city –A focus on Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria.Unpublished PhD Theses.Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Federal University of Technology Akure, Nigeria.
[7]. UNICEF (2008); Links to health, education and development; press release; 30 May, 2008.
[8]. UNICEF (¬2010); Global Warming and Sanitation Assessment 2009 Report.
[9]. United Nations Development Programme, (2008); Human Development Report.UN House, Garki, Abuja, Nigeria. SOMA Prints Limited.
[10]. Water supply and sanitation interim strategy; (2000); Personal/world/Nigeria water sector/Nigeria WSS Strategy 6-21-2000 doc; 06/26/00; 10:47 am.
[11]. Wiggins, D. (1998); Needs, Values, Truth. Third Ed. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

Adeniyi Joshua .Olu and Odogiyon Agunloye.H “Spatial Analysis of Sanitation Facilities in Ado Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.2 issue 11, pp.73-79 November 2018  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-2-issue-11/73-79.pdf

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Implication of Poverty on Health Status in Nigeria

KAKAIN Stephen, OBAYORI Joseph Bidemi – November 2018 Page No.: 80-83

The study examined the implication of poverty on health status in Nigeria. The essentiality of the study was as a result of current growing rate of poverty that has greater implication on both life expectancy and infant mortality rates. Thus, the objectives of the study were to examine the impact of poverty on life expectancy in Nigeria and as well examine the impact of poverty on infant mortality rate in Nigeria. To achieve the stated objectives, secondary data on Nigeria from World Bank data bank were collected on poverty gap, life expectancy and infant mortality rate. The study used the ADF unit root test, co-integration and granger causality tests to analyze the collected data. The ADF unit root test of the series showed that the variables were stationary at first difference. Again, the results of Engle Granger co-integration test result showed that there is a long run relationship amongst the variables. Also, Pairwise Granger causality test result showed that poverty affects both life expectancy and infant mortality rate. The paper concluded that there is high rate of poverty in the Nigerian economy and this variably will have a negative effect on the health status which will in the long run affect economic growth. Based on the findings, study recommends that Nigerian government should implement welfare programmes and increase fiscal expenditures to create employment that will check the growing rate of poverty. Also, emphasis should be placed on the capital expenditure on health sector, in this will stimulate the rapid development of the sector.

Page(s): 80-83                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 26 November 2018

 KAKAIN Stephen
Department of Agriculture and Applied Economics, Rivers State University, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

 OBAYORI Joseph Bidemi
Department of Economics, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Awka, Nigeria

[1]. Apata, T., Apata, O., Igbalajobi, O., & Awoniyi, S. M. O. (2010). Determinants of rural poverty in Nigeria: evidence from small holder farmers in south-western, Nigeria. Journal of Science and Technology Education Research, 1(4), 85-91.
[2]. Benzeval, M. & Webb, S. (1995). Family Poverty and Poor Health in Benzeval, M. and Judge K. (2001): Income and Health: the Time Dimension, Social Science & Medicine, (52) 1371-1390.
[3]. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA, 2018). Report on Socioeconomic Indicators of Nations
[4]. Deaton, A. (2001). Inequalities in Income and Inequalities in Health: Research Program in Development Studies. Princeton University.
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[6]. Edoumiekumo, S. G., Tamarauntari, M. K., & Steve S. T. (2014). Income Poverty in Nigeria: Incidence, Gap, Severity and Correlates. American Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences, 2(1), 1-9. http://dx.doi.org/10.11634/232907811402499
[7]. Flegg, A.T. (1982). Inequality of Income, Illiteracy and Medical Care as Determinants of Infant Mortality in Underdeveloped Countries. Population Studies 36,441-458.
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[10]. Obayori, J.B., Udeorah, S. & Aborh, K.B. (2018). Human Capital Investment and Poverty Reduction in Nigeria. International Journal of Research in Business, Economics and Management, 2(1), 104-115
[11]. Preston, S.H. (1975). The Changing Relation between Mortality and Level of Economic Development. Population studies
[12]. Waldmann, R.J. (1992) Income Distribution and Infant Mortality. Quarterly Journal of Economics, 1283-1302
[13]. World Bank (2016). World Development Report Washington, DC
[14]. Xavier, S, & Subramanian, A. (2003). Addressing Natural Resource Curse: An Illustration for Nigeria. IMF Working Paper. WP/03/139

KAKAIN Stephen, OBAYORI Joseph Bidemi “Implication of Poverty on Health Status in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.2 issue 11, pp.80-83 November 2018  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-2-issue-11/80-83.pdf

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Fiscal Policy and Foreign Direct Investment Inflow in a Developing Economy: The Nigeria Experience

OBAYORI, Joseph Bidemi, ABORH, Kemkamma Bright, BOSCO, Itoro Ekpenyong – November 2018 Page No.: 84-89

This study analyzed the impact of fiscal approach on Foreign Direct Investment in Nigeria. The objectives of the study were to; examine the impact of government capital expenditure on foreign direct investment in Nigeria; examine the impact of corporate tax on foreign direct investment in Nigeria; and examine the impact of government debt on foreign direct investment in Nigeria. Based on the stated objectives; secondary data were collected from CBN statistical bulletin and empirical model was estimated using Augmented Dickey Fuller unit root test, co-integration test and complemented with ECM test. The results of the unit root test showed that all the variables were stationary at order one. Also there exist three co-integrating equations amongst the variables in the model. Similarly, the ECM results indicated that the speed of adjustment is 169.6%. Also, the R2 of 63% showed that the model is a good fit. The coefficient of government total debt variable is positively related to FDI. The coefficient of corporate tax is negatively related with Foreign Direct Investment and the coefficient of government capital expenditure is positively related with Foreign Direct Investment. Thus, it could be concluded that a well-articulated and coordinated fiscal policy to attract foreign investment in Nigeria became essential for optimum growth and development of the economy. Therefore, it is recommended that Nigeria government must create enabling environment for foreign investment to thrive. Also, government should increase her capital expenditure and ensure a well combination and coordination of both fiscal and other policies to increase foreign direct investment in Nigeria.

Page(s): 84-89                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 26 November 2018

 OBAYORI, Joseph Bidemi
Department of Economics, Faculty of Social Sciences, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka Nigeria

 ABORH, Kemkamma Bright
Department of Economics, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria

 BOSCO, Itoro Ekpenyong
Department of Economics, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria

[1]. Ateyah, M.A, Torki, M.A & George, N. S.(2015).The Impact of the Fiscal and Quantitative Monetary Policies on the Domestic and Foreign Investment in Jordan: An Empirical Study. International Journal of Academic Research in Accounting, Finance and Management Sciences.5 (4), 1-10.
[2]. Bengos, M. & Sanchez-Robles, B. (2003). Foreign Direct Investment, Economic Freedom and Growth: New Evidence from Latin America. European Journal of Political Economy, 19(3), 529–45.
[3]. Blonigen, B.A. & Wang, M. (2005). Inappropriate Pooling of Wealthy and Poor Countries in Empirical FDI Studies, Chapter 9. In Moran, T., Graham, E. &Blomström, M. (Eds.). Does Foreign Direct Investment Promote Development? Washington D.C.; Institute for International Economics.
[4]. Central Bank of Nigeria (2001). Annual Report and Statement of Accounts, Various Years. 12, 8-10.
[5]. Cookey, A.E, Otto, G. &Adeneye, A. (2014).Foreign Direct Investment and Economic Growth in Nigeria. West African Journal of Business and Management Sciences, 3 (3), 24-40.
[6]. Hines, J. (1999). Lessons from Behavioral Responses to International Taxation. National Tax Journal, 5(2), 305–322.
[7]. International Monetary Funds (IMF, 2012). World Development Report.
[8]. Johansen, S. (1998). Statistical Analysis and CointegratingVectors. Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, 12(2-3), 231-254.
[9]. Kolawole, B.O. &Odubunmi, S.A. (2015).Government Capital Expenditure, Foreign Direct Investment and Economic Growth Relationship in Nigeria. Mediterranean Journal of Social Sciences,6(4), 444-453.

[10]. Magdalena, R. & Elena, D. (2014).The Impact of Fiscal Policy on Foreign Direct Investments. Empiric Evidence from Romania.Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1331677X.2014.947133, 16th October, 2014.
[11]. Mihaela, G. & Paula, N. (2012). Fiscal Policy and Foreign Direct Investment: Evidence from some Emerging EU Economies. Procedia – Social and Behavioral Sciences 58 (2012), 1256 – 1266.
[12]. Morisset, J., & Pirnia, N. (2000). How Tax Policy and Incentives Affect Foreign Direct Investment. A Review.The World Bank and International Finance Corporation Foreign Investment Advisory Service. Policy Research Working Paper, no. 2509, 1–34.
[13]. Niti, B. (2010).The Impact of Fiscal Policy on Foreign Direct Investment Inflows: A Study of India and Select Asian Economies. Retrieved from www.journalpressindia.com, 15th January, 2011.
[14]. Obayori, J.B. (2016). Fiscal Policy and Unemployment in Nigeria. The International Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities Invention. 3(2), 1887-1891.
[15]. Obida, G.W. & Abu, N. (2010). Determinants of Foreign Direct Investment in Nigeria: An Empirical Analysis. Global Journal of Human Social Science.10(1), 22447-22457.
[16]. Saleh, A.S. (2003). The Budget Deficit and Economic Performance: A Survey. University of Wollongong Economics Working Paper Series. WP 03-12.
[17]. Summers, L. H. (2000), Taxation and corporate investment: A q-Theory Approach. Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, 1, 67-127.
[18]. Surry, S. (2003). Tax Sensitivity of Inbound Foreign Direct Investment: The Indian Experience. M. Phil. Dissertation submitted to the Department of Commerce, Delhi School of Economics, and University of Delhi.
[19]. Swensson, D. (1994). The Impact of US Tax reform on Foreign Direct Investment in the United States. Journal of Public Economics, 54, 67–83.

OBAYORI, Joseph Bidemi, ABORH, Kemkamma Bright, BOSCO, Itoro Ekpenyong “Fiscal Policy and Foreign Direct Investment Inflow in a Developing Economy: The Nigeria Experience” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.2 issue 11, pp.84-89 November 2018  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-2-issue-11/84-89.pdf

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The Fight against Corruption in Ghana: The Role of the Church and Church Leaders

Rev. Anthony Kofi Anomah – November 2018 Page No.: 90-98

This paper investigates the role of the Church and Christian Leaders in the fight against corruption in Ghana. Paradoxically, about 71% of the total population of 29.4 million Ghanaian claim allegiance to Christianity, with membership in one Christian denomination or the other. However, transparency international report in 2015 ranked Ghana second with 76%, even though earlier reports on Ghana by other Corruption Perception Index had ranked Ghana favourably in relation to other countries in Africa. This paper reviews mainly secondary sources on the Internet using news and business items in the Ghanaian media in the last twenty years (1998-20018) and primary data from a doctoral research to explore the causes and effects of corruption on Ghana’s development and the role of the Church and Church Leaders in the country’s efforts to curb the menace of corruption.

Page(s): 90-98                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 27 November 2018

 Rev. Anthony Kofi Anomah
Department of Religious Studies, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana

Reference are not Available.

Rev. Anthony Kofi Anomah “The Fight against Corruption in Ghana: The Role of the Church and Church Leaders” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.2 issue 11, pp.90-98 November 2018  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-2-issue-11/90-98.pdf

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Fiscal Federalism in Nigeria: Implication to the Economy of States

Robinson Monday Olulu, Udeorah, Sylvester Alor F. – November 2018 Page No.: 99-110

The paper discusses fiscal federalism in Nigeria, and the implication to the economy of states. Federalism, fiscal federalism and inter-governmental relations were defined in the conceptual framework, while basic theories of fiscal federalism were reviewed. The empirical issues/opinions of experts on fiscal federalism concluded the literature review. The paper reviewed the evolution of fiscal federalism in Nigeria; Sir S. Philipson headed the first fiscal commission preparatory to the 1954 federal constitution. Other commissions/instruments of fiscal federalism include, the Hicks-Philipson, Louis Chick, Jeremy Raisman and R.C. Tress, the Bin, Decree 15 of 1967, the Dina Commission, the Aboyade committee, Pius Okigbo, T.Y. Danjuma Commission and the Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, 1999. The paper discovered that the Nigerian fiscal imbalance was to a large extent masterminded by the military governments. That the states in Nigeria are structurally constrained to perform their constitutional responsibilities because of appropriation of greater quantity of the national resources to the purview of the government at the centre. Taxes and Royalties that were hitherto paid to states have been directed to the federal purse. The Exclusive and Concurrent lists, in favour of the government at the centre negate the economic prosperity of states in Nigeria. It is important that the Exclusive and the Concurrent lists as contained in the 1999 Constitution be reviewed. States must be made to own and exploit resources in its territory to carryout their statutory responsibilities. The federal government should refund states that have repaired federal roads, and projects. While in the near future the federal government should hand-off certain responsibilities, such as Roads, Education, Agriculture, Sanitation, etc. The distributable funds for these projects should go to the states treasury. The restructure of the Nigerian federal system will strengthen the economy of states, and pave way for more equitable society and welfare of citizens.

Page(s): 99-110                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 29 November 2018

 Robinson Monday Olulu
Ph.D, Department of Economics, University of Port Harcourt, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

 Udeorah, Sylvester Alor F.
Ph.D, Department of Economics, University of Port Harcourt, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

[1]. Agiobenebo, T.J. (1999). Assignment, criteria and the fiscal constitution: An excursion into a theory of rational fiscal federalism. Paper presented at the Annual Conference, NES. Ibadan, Secre-Print Nigeria Ltd.
[2]. Akindele, S.T. and Olaopa, K. (2012). Fiscal federalism and local government finance in Nigeria: An examination of revenue, rights and fiscal jurisdiction. Cited in Omotosho, F. (ed) Contemporary issues in public administration. Lagos: Bolaby Publications.
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[5]. Anyanwu, J.C. 1997). The structure of Nigeria economy (1960-1997). Onitsha: Joanee Educational Publishers Ltd.
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[10]. Louis, C. (1953). The Report of the Fiscal Commission on Financial Commissions: Effects of proposal on new constitutional arrangement, Lagos.
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[12]. Oates, W. (1992). Revenue allocation in Nigeria, 1970-80. Nigeria Journal of Economic and Social Studies, 17(2), July.
[13]. Oates, W.E. (2009). An essay on fiscal federalism. Journal of Economic Literature (JTOR), 17(3), 20-49.
[14]. Tanzi, V. (1995). Fiscal federalism and decentralisation: A review of some efficiency and macroeconomic aspects. In Bruno, M. and B. Leskovic (eds), op cit. 295-316.
[15]. Tella, S.A. (2009) Promoting states economic independence through finance market cooperation in fiscal federalism and Nigeria economic development. Proceeding of NES. Ibadan.
[16]. Ugwu, C.N. (2002). Decentralizing the ownership of resources and assets: An imperative for peace and true federalism in Nigeria. unpublished lecture at the Institute of Public Policy, Lagos.
[17]. Vincent, O.O. (2001). Fiscal federalism: The Nigerian experience, Fourth Public Lecture, The Nigerian Economic Society.
[18]. Wheare, K.C. (1963). Federal government (4th edition). New York: Oxford University Press.

Robinson Monday Olulu, Udeorah, Sylvester Alor F. “Fiscal Federalism in Nigeria: Implication to the Economy of States” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.2 issue 11, pp.99-110 November 2018  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-2-issue-11/99-110.pdf

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Human Resource Management Practices and Performance in Public Secondary Schools in the Thika West Sub-County of Kenya

Eunice Warigia Ngotho – November 2018 Page No.: 111-116

This research project aimed at investigating the relationship between Human Resource Management practices and performance in public secondary schools in Kenya. The objectives of the study are to: establish the relationship between training and development and performance in public secondary schools in Thika West Sub-County Kenya; determine the relationship between management style and performance in public secondary schools in Thika West Sub-County Kenya; assess the effect of performance management on the performance in public secondary schools in Thika West Sub-County Kenya and; determine the relationship between compensation and reward and performance in public secondary schools in Thika West Sub-County Kenya. This study is based on three theoretical foundations: Expectancy Theory, Human Capital Theory and; McGregor’s Theory X and Theory Y. The study adopts the descriptive survey design. The study sampled 120 teachers and 5 principles from the 16 public schools in the sub-county. The study collected both primary and secondary data using a structured questionnaires and interviews. Data from key informants will be analysed thematically. Descriptive statistics, inferential statistics and Pearson correlation will be used to analyse the data. On the first objective of the study, findings from Pearson correlation shows that there was significant relationship between performance of public secondary schools and training and development (r=0.870, p<0.05). On the second objective of the study, the findings show that principals’ leadership styles contribute to student achievement indirectly through teacher commitment and beliefs about their collective capacity. In this regard, the findings from Pearson correlation shows that there was significant relationship between performance of public secondary schools and management style (r=0.648, p<0.05).On the third objective of the study namely, the findings show that there was positive and significant relationship between performance management systems and employee performance (Pearson correlation, r=0.844, p<0.05). On the last objective of the study, the findings obtained show that rewards positively contributed to the performance of teachers (Pearson correlation, r =0.885, p<0.05). In view of the findings of the study it is recommended that the government should put in place mechanisms for enhancing progressive training and development for teachers. Effort should be made to ensure consultative, democratic and transformational leadership styles are promoted in schools. Performance management should also be strengthened in schools so as to enhance assessment and feedback among teachers. Lastly, teachers’ salary increment proposals should be promptly implemented.

Page(s): 111-116                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 29 November 2018

 Eunice Warigia Ngotho
MBA, Kenyatta University, Kenya

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[2]. Ali, R., & Ahmad, M. S. (2009). The impact of reward and recognition programs on employee’s motivation and satisfaction: an empirical study. International Review of Business Research Papers, 5 (4), 270-279.
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Eunice Warigia Ngotho “Human Resource Management Practices and Performance in Public Secondary Schools in the Thika West Sub-County of Kenya” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.2 issue 11, pp.111-116 November 2018  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-2-issue-11/111-116.pdf

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The Suitable Strategies to Implement Science in Teaching and Learning More Effectively In Malaysian Secondary Schools

Deviki Muniandy and Hasimah Alimon – November 2018 Page No.: 117-120

Form Three Assessment (PT3) in Malaysia has been introduced in less than a decade, replacing the Penilaian Menengah Rendah (PMR). Since the first batch of PT3 implementation had ended their written examination in 2014, no clear findings with regard to PT3 holders’ low performance in science subject and it’s not have been discussed widely. Thus, this study emphasized on the strategies can be used by students, teachers, policy makers and school administrators towards the teaching and learning of Science subject. A qualitative approach has been applied. Interview protocols was constructed and validated by three experts. The pilot test was carried out for the reliability. The respondent were chose using purposive random sampling. All the strategies come together under four sub-topics namely training, coaching or facilitating, management and effective teaching and learning. Training strategy consist of effective refreshment courses by district and state officers, courses for all the teachers during school holidays, senior teachers need courses, workshops for teachers at school level and quality delivery of in-house training. Coaching and facilitation are consists of effective monitoring system, peer coaching, own exploration, teachers learn from seniors, sharing experience among senior teachers and youngers and teachers must upgrades themselves. Management included laboratory assistant roles. The effective teaching and learning consist of types of assessment and project work, emphasize on practical work, fun methods during intervention programs and quality of intervention program. This study conclude that the policy makers, school administrators, students and teachers should realize their role and responsibility to ensure the effectiveness in teaching and learning Science and the development of education in Malaysia.

Page(s): 117-120                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 29 November 2018

 Deviki Muniandy
Faculty of Science and Mathematics, Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris (Malaysia)

 Hasimah Alimon
Faculty of Science and Mathematics, Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris (Malaysia)

[1]. Andrea Schleicher, 2012, Preparing Teachers and developing school leaders for the 21stCentury, Lesson from around the world.
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[5]. Munro, Craig (2011), Six Essential Component of Peer Coaching.
[6]. Professional development of teachers. 2009. OECD
[7]. Science Community Representing Education (SCORE, 2014), 2009.

Deviki Muniandy and Hasimah Alimon “The Suitable Strategies to Implement Science in Teaching and Learning More Effectively In Malaysian Secondary Schools” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.2 issue 11, pp.117-120 November 2018  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-2-issue-11/117-120.pdf

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Knowledge Sharing: A Recipe for Corporate Sustainability

TAMUNOMIEBI, Miebaka Dagogo, OFURUM, Ugonna Augustina – November 2018 Page No.: 121-130

The paper critically reviewed knowledge sharing as a recipe for corporate sustainability. Knowledge is the most vital strategic resource that can make an organization to achieve sustainable competitive advantage over their competitors. As a result of this, knowledge management becomes a must do process for organizations. Reviews however, show the crux of knowledge management to be knowledge sharing and this forms the focus of this paper. The main aim of this paper is to review the effect of knowledge sharing on corporate sustainability. The paper is a theoretical review of extant literature on the concepts of knowledge, knowledge management, knowledge sharing and corporate sustainability. It also reviewed the importance of sharing knowledge, challenges encountered while sharing knowledge, how to encourage knowledge sharing and its alignment with corporate sustainability. The paper further reviewed some empirical works on the outcomes of knowledge sharing; organizational performance, innovation, organizational learning, organizational culture and employee resilience. The paper then concluded that knowledge sharing is an indispensable element of an organization’s intellectual capital which assists organization to remain in business in the long run and also help them maximize their stakeholders’ value. The paper also concluded that knowledge will be valueless if it is acquired, converted, retained and not shared. Based on this backdrop, organizations striving to survive in the face of globalization and intense competition should develop a culture that embraces knowledge sharing.

Page(s): 121-130                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 01 December 2018

 TAMUNOMIEBI, Miebaka Dagogo
Ph D., Department of Management, Faculty of Management Sciences, Rivers, State University, Nkpolu-Oroworukwo, PMB 5080, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

 OFURUM, Ugonna Augustina
Doctoral Candidate, Department of Management, Faculty of Management Sciences, Rivers State University, Nkpolu-Oroworukwo, PMB 5080, Port Harcourt, Nigeria.

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[4]. Aras, G., & Crowther, D. (2008). Governance and sustainability: An investigation into the relationship between corporate governance and corporate sustainability. Management Decision, 46(3), 433–448.
[5]. Argote, L. & Ingram, P. (2000). Knowledge transfer: A basis for competitive advantage in firms, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 82(1), 150-69.
[6]. Bagaja, G. W. (2015). Effect of employee knowledge sharing on organizational performance in public Universities in Kenya, case of University of Nairobi. The Strategic Journal of Business and Change Management, 2(23), 444-464.
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TAMUNOMIEBI, Miebaka Dagogo, OFURUM, Ugonna Augustina “Knowledge Sharing: A Recipe for Corporate Sustainability” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.2 issue 11, pp.121-130 November 2018  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-2-issue-11/121-130.pdf

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Determination of New Suspect in Pretrial Hearing (Case Study of the Judgment in South Jakarta District Court Number: 24/Pid.Pra/2018/PN. JKT.SEL)

Aji Rahmadi, Prof. Supanto, SH. M.Hum, Dr. Widodo Tresno Novianto, SH, M.Hum – November 2018 Page No.: 131-138

This research was normative legal research used case approach that focused on the judge’s consideration to reach the decision. The purpose of this study is basically to find out the judge’s consideration in granting the petition for the determination of a new suspect in a pretrial hearing. Normative provisions regarding the authority of the pretrial institution were basically regulated in a limited manner, but the Aquo judge had other considerations, namely the act of participating from other parties who had been referred to in the principal verdict of the case that has been in Kracht, where the indictment and verdict have outlined the role of parties considered to be participating in aquo acts. So that the judges considered it fair that the parties participated in the corruption act must also be responsible for their actions so that in the pretrial hearing then granted the request to assign a new suspect.

Page(s): 131-138                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 31 November 2018

 Aji Rahmadi
Graduate Student, Law Studies Universitas Sebelas Maret Surakarta, Indonesia

 Prof. Supanto, SH. M.Hum
Graduate Lecturer, Law Studies Universitas Sebelas Maret Surakarta, Indonesia

 Dr. Widodo Tresno Novianto, SH, M.Hum
Graduate Lecturer, Law Studies Universitas Sebelas Maret Surakarta, Indonesia

Books
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[10]. Junaedi, “Pesan Pembaharuan Hakim Sarpin”, http/www.hukumonline.com/baca/berita/lt54f6621/pesan-pembaharuan-hakim-sarpin-broleh-junaedi-sh-msi-llm, retrieved on September 18, 2018.
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[17]. Judgment of pretrial South Jakarta District Court Number: 24/Pid.Pra /2018/PN. Jkt.Sel.
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Aji Rahmadi, Prof. Supanto, SH. M.Hum, Dr. Widodo Tresno Novianto, SH, M.Hum “Determination of New Suspect in Pretrial Hearing (Case Study of the Judgment in South Jakarta District Court Number: 24/Pid.Pra/2018/PN. JKT.SEL)” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.2 issue 11, pp.131-138 November 2018  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-2-issue-11/131-138.pdf

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Equipment, Accessibility and Productivity of Security Organizations in Nigeria

Ukwayi, J.K., Agba, A. M. Ogaboh & Agba, M. S – November 2018 Page No.: 139-144

The concern of this study is on the effect of equipment and its accessibility on the performance of security organizations in Nigeria with particular reference to the Niger Delta region. The study specifically examines how crime prevention equipment, and arms/ammunition influence the effectiveness of private and public security outfits in the Niger Delta region. Information was gathered using open and closed ended questionnaire from 1200 participants selected from the region. Data were subjected to statistical analysis and presented for easy interpretations in tables, per cent and charts. Result shows that availability of security equipment and security personnel access to working tools significantly affect the performance of security organizations in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria. We recommended among others urgent provision of security apparatus to security organizations through public-private partnership; and that security organizations should be granted guided and good access equipment available in their organizations.

Page(s): 139-144                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 03 December 2018

 Ukwayi, J.K.
Lecturers, Department of Sociology, University of Calabar, Nigeria

 Agba, A. M. Ogaboh
Lecturers, Department of Sociology, University of Calabar, Nigeria

 Agba, M. S
Department of Public Administration, University of Calabar, Nigeria

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[33]. Obi, C. &Rustad, S. A. (2011). Oil and insurgency in the Niger Delta: Managing the complex politics of petro-violence. London: Zed Books.
[34]. Okonata, I. & Douglas, 0. (2003). Where vultures feast. Online available at: e.wikippdia.orglwikilconflict-in-the-Niger-Delta. Retrieved 18/08/16.
[35]. Omang, T. A., Yongyang, Chris-Valentine, O., Eneji, M.A. (2012). Cash Cropping as an Effective Strategy for poverty Reduction in Nigeria: The Case of Cocoa Farming in Etung Local Government Area of Cross River State. Journal of Agriculture, Biotechnology and Ecology, 5 (3).
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[38]. Rainey, H. G. (1997). Understanding and managing public organisations (2nd ed.), San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
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Ukwayi, J.K., Agba, A. M. Ogaboh & Agba, M. S “Equipment, Accessibility and Productivity of Security Organizations in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.2 issue 11, pp.139-144 November 2018  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-2-issue-11/139-144.pdf

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Development Agencies And Community Development: Assessment of the World Bank’s Commercial Agriculture Development Project (CADP) in Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria

Attah, F.M. & Angioha, P. U. – November 2018 Page No.: 145-152

The study examines the relationship between development agencies and Community development: Assessment of the World Bank’s Commercial Agriculture Development Project (CADP) in Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria.the objective of the study was to examine the relationship between the world bank Commercial Agricultural Development Project and youth capacity building and agricultural development in Calabar Cross River state, Nigeria. Literature was reviewed based on the variables raised for the study and the institutional theory was adopted for the study. The study adopted the ex post facto research design and one hundred and twenty (120) beneficiaries of the World Bank Commercial Agriculture Development project (CADP) were selected using the snowballing sampling technique. Data used for this study was derived from both primary and secondary data. The instrument used for this study is the questionnaire. Data collected from the field were analysed using the necessary and appropriate statistical tool like Frequency distribution, simple percentages and Pearson product moment correlation coefficient. Result revealed that there a significant relationship between Development agencies (World Bank activities) and youth capacity building in Calabar, Cross River state, Nigeria andthere a significant relationship between Development agencies (World Bank activities) and increase in agricultural production in Calabar Cross River state, Nigeria. The study therefore recommends that Efforts should be put in place by the Cross River State Government in collaboration with the development agenciess to explore the use of local resources and relevant technology that have the capacity to alleviate poverty and enhance community development among others.

Page(s): 145-152                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 03 December 2018

 Attah, F.M.
Department of Sociology, University of Calabar, Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria

 Angioha, P. U.
Graduate Student, University of Calabar, Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria

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[3]. Ajani, E. N., Mgbenka, R. N. &Onah, O. (2015). Empowerment of youths in rural areas through agricultural development programmes: Implementations of poverty reduction in Nigeria. International Journal of Research in Agriculture and Forestry, 2(2), pp 34-41
[4]. Amungwa F. A (2015). New trends in rural community development practice in Africa: The case of Cameroon‟sgrassfield rural development project. Journal of Agricultural Extension and Rural Development; Vol.7(7), pp. 240-246:
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Attah, F.M. & Angioha, P. U. “Development Agencies And Community Development: Assessment of the World Bank’s Commercial Agriculture Development Project (CADP) in Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.2 issue 11, pp.145-152 November 2018  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-2-issue-11/145-152.pdf

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Access to Urban Services in the Wave of Neoliberalism: A Study of the Urban Poor in Dhaka, Bangladesh

Shamsul Arefin, Tamanna Rashid – November 2018 Page No.: 153-158

Dhaka city has become a highly unequal society where neoliberal economic restructuring is continuously depriving the urban poor from all sorts of urban services e.g. water, gas, electricity, sanitation, healthcare services as well as education. In this backdrop, this study is to explore the basic urban services given by different stakeholders to the poor in the wave of neoliberalism in Dhaka. Harvey’s ‘Neoliberalism as creative destruction’ (2007) and ‘Right to the City’ (2008) have been used to make the study theoretically vibrant. Mixed method strategies have been applied for conducting this study majorly followed by Survey counting 180 respondents as the sample which is supplemented by 6in-depth interviews. Pallabi slum at Mirpur-12 and Sat Tala slum at Mohakhali are considered as the study areas as most of the urban poor prefer living here because of relatively low costing than the other areas of the city. Descriptive analysis with statistical program and thematic analysis with necessary narratives of the subjects have been carried out for the analysis of the data. Study reveals that about 96.1% of the respondents have no access to land. On the other hand about 80.6%, 96.1% and 87.8% of the total respondents have access to water, electricity and gas supply respectively. Besides, about 77.8% and 55.6% of the total respondents have access to healthcare services and educational institutions in these areas. Although neoliberal state is withdrawing from its social commitments, the non-stake agencies especially private sectors are taking the responsibilities of various urban services.

Page(s): 153-158                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 December 2018

 Shamsul Arefin
Department of Sociology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University, Gopalganj-8100, Bangladesh

 Tamanna Rashid
Department of Sociology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University, Gopalganj-8100, Bangladesh

[1]. Arefin, Shamsul. (2017). Neoliberalism and the Right to the City: A study of the urban poor in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Unpublished Master’s Thesis, Department of Sociology, University of Dhaka.
[2]. Haque, K. N. (2012). The Political Economy of Urban Space in Dhaka City: “Accumulation by Dispossession”. Dhaka: Institute of Global Governance (IGS), BRAC University.
[3]. Harvey, D. (2007). A brief history of neoliberalism. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
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[5]. Harvey, D. (2008, Sep/Oct). The Right to the City. New Left Review, pp. 23-40.
[6]. Harvey, D. (2011). The Enigma of Capital and Crises of Capitalism (First South Asian Edition Ed.). Profile Book.
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[8]. Lefebvre, H. (1967). The Right to the City. In I. K. E., & L. E. (Ed.).Writings on Cities (pp. 63-184). London: Blackwell.
[9]. Mark Blyth. (2013). Austerity: The History of a Dangerous Idea. New York: Oxford University Press.
[10]. Muhammad, Anu. (2016, March). Bangladesh- A Model of Neoliberalism. Monthly Review, 66(10). Retrieved from http://monthlyreview.org/2015/03/01/bangladesh-a-model-of-neoliberalism/
[11]. Tamanna, M. (2014). Neoliberal restructuring and the urban Poor: Does Urban Poor Doing Better than Their Rural Counterparts? Australian Academy of Business and Social Sciences Conference 2014 (pp. 1-11). Australia: The Journal of Development Areas.
[12]. Ullah, A. A. (2016, November). A Neoliberal Bureaucratic Black Hole of the State: A Short Review of the Bangladeshi Garment Industry in the Era of Neoliberalism. The PEN ‘N” PAPER, pp. 1-4. Retrieved from http://www.thepenandpaper.com.au/international
[13]. UN-HABITAT. (2008). State of the World’s Cities 2010/11; Bridging the Urban Divide. Earthscan, London and Sterling, VA.UN-HABITAT.
[14]. UN-HABITAT. (2012, September 5). Urban Slum. Massive Urban Slum in Developing countries / Retrieved from http://www.unhabitat.org/pmss/listItemDetails.aspx?publicationID=2917/;geography.about.com/od/urbaneconomicgeography/a/Urban-Slums.htm
[15]. Wacquant, L. (2001). The penalization of poverty and the rise of neo-liberalism. European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research, 9(4), 401-412.
[16]. Wikipedia. (2016, October).Accumulation by Dispossession. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accumulation_by_dispossession

Shamsul Arefin, Tamanna Rashid “Access to Urban Services in the Wave of Neoliberalism: A Study of the Urban Poor in Dhaka, Bangladesh” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.2 issue 11, pp.153-158 November 2018  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-2-issue-11/153-158.pdf

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A Study to Rationalize the Degree of Targeting Rural Community Development through the Development Projects Localized Within Rural Communities (Based on Mattala Rajapaksha Airport Construction Project in Sri Lanka)

Samarakoon MT – November 2018 Page No.: 159-176

Third world countries in the global setting implement wide-ranging development projects to achieve imperative development ambitions and those projects are in different attributes as well. It is a noticeable fact that Sri Lanka being one of the Asian countries initiated colossal effort to establish Mattala Rajapaksha Airport in Southern Sri Lanka .The pivotal focus of this project was to improve tourism industry and to provide services for airlines, also based on a rural social structure in the area of Mattala. In this context, this research study revealed to which degree the attention was paid on the rural social structure while ensuing aspirations of people on rural development in the area of Mattala once the Airport development project is implemented within the framework of national development goals. In this respect it was possible to diagnose that this area being a prominent Agro-based locale and people had lost their cultivable land across the project. Yet, in contrary, the community in the area could access for new job opportunity which was a direct outcome of the project. However, a review was done through this study on how best the project required to give higher priority to surmount the needs of communities such as ; infra structural facilities, access for services and other essential social needs.

Page(s): 159-176                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 December 2018

 Samarakoon MT
Professor in Sociology, Department of Sociology, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Sri Lanka

[1]. Barclays (2015). Environmental and Social Risk Briefing Infrastructure. [ebook] Barclays Bank PLC. Available at: https://www.home.barclays/content/dam/barclayspublic/docs/Citizenship/infrastructure-guidance-note.pdf [Accessed 17 Aug. 2018].
[2]. Ernst and Young (2012). Economic and Social analysis of potential airport Sites. [ebook] Available at: http://westernsydneyairport.gov.au/scopingstudy/files/Ernst_and_Young-Economic_and_social_analysis_of_potential_airport_sites.pdf [Accessed 21 Aug. 2018].
[3]. Muthukrishnan, M. (2011). Airport Business and Local Community Development. [ebook] Available at: http://www.aci-asiapac.aero/services/main/15/upload/service/15/self/55cc659f3591e.pdf [Accessed 17 Aug. 2018].
[4]. Rural Planning Group (n.d.). Airports & Land use: An Introduction to the Local Leaders. [ebook] Available at: http://www.ruralplanning.org/assets/airport-land-use-guide—web.pdf [Accessed 17 Aug. 2018].
[5]. Samarakoon M, Wijewardhana BVN, Wijethunga WTD (2018), A sociological study on generational crisis in relation to colonization system in Sri Lanka, International Journal of Humanities and Social Science Research ISSN: 2455-2070 Impact Factor: RJIF 5.22 www.socialsciencejournal.in Volume 4; Issue 2; March 2018; Page No. 58-65
[6]. http://www.socialsciencejournal.in/download/470/4-2-28-975.pdf
[7]. Samarakoon MT,(2018), Study on the decisive factors of ownership of the land occupied by traders adjoining to the sacred sites and related impediments (Special reference to Kataragama Sacred zone in Sri Lanka) International Journal of Academic Research and Development ISSN: 2455-4197 Impact Factor: RJIF 5.22 www.academicsjournal.com Volume 3; Issue 5; September 2018; Page No. 68-75
[8]. Samarakoon MT (2018), Study on the causes affected the manifestation of sub culture within the socio-economic milieu of street venders (Special reference to Katharagama Sacred zone in Sri Lanka), International Journal of Advanced Scientific Research ISSN: 2456-0421 Impact Factor: RJIF 5.32 www.allscientificjournal.com Volume 3; Issue 5; September 2018; Page No. 37-44
[9]. United Nations (2003). An Integrated Approach to Rural Development Dialogues at the Economic and Social Council. [ebook] Available at: http://www.un.org/en/ecosoc/docs/pdfs/an_integrated_approach_to_rural_development.pdf [Accessed 27 Aug. 2018].
[10]. Wickramasooriya, P. (2011). Aviation – Economic Engine In Sri Lanka’s Growth. [ebook] Available at: http://www.hdcc.lk/invest/download/Air_port.pdf [Accessed 23 Aug. 2018].

Samarakoon MT “A Study to Rationalize the Degree of Targeting Rural Community Development through the Development Projects Localized Within Rural Communities (Based on Mattala Rajapaksha Airport Construction Project in Sri Lanka)” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.2 issue 11, pp.159-176 November 2018  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-2-issue-11/159-176.pdf

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Contributions of ZaidBnThabit in the Development of Islamic Law of Inheritance

Dr. Muntaka Yahaya Aminu – November 2018 Page No.: 177-181

ZaidbnThabit (RA) was one of the renowned Sahabah of the Prophet (SAW). He was one of the prominent scribes of the noble Prophet (SAW). He was one of the four prominent companions who specialized in Islamic law of succession. Namely: AliyubnAbiTalib, Ibn Abbas and IbnMas’ud (RA). He was commended by the Prophet (SAW), among the Sahabah and other prominent scholars for his deep understanding of Islamic law of inheritance. ZaidbnThabit (RA) held a number of opinions regarding some aspects of mirath. He exercised various juristic analogies (Ijtihadat) on Islamic law of inheritance. Most of his views form the majority line. It is in view of this development that this paper seeks to analyze some of his major opinions on Islamic law of inheritance and the significance of the views to the development of the science.

Page(s): 177-181                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 December 2018

 Dr. Muntaka Yahaya Aminu
Department of Islamic Studies, Faculty of Arts and Islamic Studies, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria

[1]. Al-Bukhari, M. I. (2009),Sahih al-Bukhari,Muhsin, M. (trans.): Beirut. Daru al-Arabia.
[2]. AbiDawud, S. A. (2003), SunanAbiDawud, A. Abdul-khair et-tal (eds.), Dar al-Hadith.
[3]. Abdul-Jawad, A. (1419 A.H), Usul al-Ilm al-Mwarith, Dar al-kutub al-Ilmiyyah, Beirut, First Edition.
[4]. Al-Tirmithy, I. M. (1999).Sunan Al-Tirmithy, First edition, Al- Shakir, A. M. (ed), Al-Qahirah, Dar Al-Hadith.
[5]. Al-Sabuni, M. A. (1423 A.H), Al-Miraath Fi al-Shari’ah Al-Islamiyyah, Dar-Al-Sabuni, First Edition.
[6]. Al-Qur’an-Kareem, (1997), Arabic text with corresponding English meanings, Al-Muntada Al Islamy: AbulQasim Publishing House.
[7]. Badaruddin M. M. (1421AH),Irshad al-FaridIlaKashf al-Gawamid, Maktabat Dar al Istiqamah, First Edition.
[8]. Fauzan, S. A. (2017),Al-Tahqiqat al-Mardiyyah, Dar Ahl al-Qur’an, Saudiyyah, First Edition.
[9]. Hussaini, A. (2005), the Islamic Law of Succession, Riyadh, Maktaba Dar-Us-Salam.
[10]. Hallaq, M. S. (2008), Fiqh according to the Qur’an and Sunnah, Riyadh, Maktabah Dar-Us-Salam, King Fahad National Library Cataloging-in-publication Data, Hallaq, Muhammad Subhi.
[11]. IbnHajr, A. (n. d), Al-Isabah fi Tamyiz al-Sahabah, Tarjamah, (N.P), (N.P).
[12]. IbnRushid, A. (1989), Bidayah Al-MujtahidWaNihayat Al-Muqtasid,Makkah, Maktabat Nizaar Mustapha.
[13]. M.Y. Al-Amin, (2015), Taysir al-Ghawamid, Sharif Mahir Investment, Kano, first Edition.
[14]. Shanqity, A. A. (2005), Mawahib al-jalil min Adillat al-Khalil, Dar al-kutab al-Ilmiyyah, Beirut, Vol. 4.

Dr. Muntaka Yahaya Aminu “Contributions of ZaidBnThabit in the Development of Islamic Law of Inheritance” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.2 issue 11, pp.177-181 November 2018  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-2-issue-11/177-181.pdf

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Adequate Study and Application of Islamic Law: A Mechanism for National Advancement in Nigeria in the 21st Century

Dr. Lawal Abdulkareem – November 2018 Page No.: 182-185

It is an undisputable fact that laws made by man are full of selfishness, injustice and ignorance. Many loopholes can be detected in such laws because man is not perfect in his foresight and knowledge. The operation of regional self-rule introduced in the McPherson constitution of 1954, is a clear testimony to this. That constitution brought forward a number of situations which made Nigerians start to feel they were ethnically different. Thus, the seeds of the ethnic problems were planted in the fertile soil of regionalism since the country’s independence in 1960. The subsequent legal systems that were/are being operated during both military and civilian administrations have only led to increases in crime-rate, in broken- homes, in mental diseases, in chaos and confusion. Why? This is because these laws are man -made. Nigeria is therefore in need of a standard legal system which can guarantee peace, justice, harmony and stability among people. A legal system, which is free from selfishness or constant changes and amendment. And above all, a legal system that covers everything needed for national advancement especially in this 21st century. Undoubtedly, the only legal system, which possesses the qualities mentioned above, is the Islamic law. This is because, it is a way of life prescribed by Allah, the Almighty. It never collides with man’s natural disposition, nor prevents him from having material advancement or moral perfection. Islamic law is also relevant to all periods and provides solutions to all problems. Hence, Islamic law is a mechanism for national advancement in this present millennium. Thus, this paper is an attempt to examine the significance of adequate study and application of Islamic legal system for the progress and development of Nigerian citizens.

Page(s): 182-185                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 06 December 2018

 Dr. Lawal Abdulkareem
Department of Islamic Studies, Faculty of Arts and Islamic Studies, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria

[1]. Abdullahi, Y.A. (Copyrighted 1968) The Holy Qur’an: Text,Translation and Commentary, Dar AI-Arabiyyah, Beirut, Lebanon.
[2]. Abubakar, J.J. (2002/1422) Minhaj al-Muslim, Daral-Fikr, Beirnt, Lebanon.
[3]. AbdurRahaman, I.D (1984/1404) Shari’ah: The Islamic Law, Ta Ha Publishers, London, United Kingdom.
[4]. A’isha, B.L (1990). Islamic Studies For Senior SecondarySchools (Bk1) Islamic Education Trust Publications Division, Minna, Niger State
[5]. Al-Suyuti, J. (849 CE/911AH) Al-Jami’ al-Saghir, Dar al-Fikr, Vol. 2
[6]. IbnKathir, (2004/1424). Tafsir al-Qur’an al-Azim, Vol.1, Dar al- Kutub al-llmiyyah, Beirut, Lebanon.
[7]. IbnKathir, Al-BidayahWal-Nihayah, Mauqi’ Ruh al-Islam, Vol. 8
[8]. Tamuno, T.N and Ukpabi, S.C, (1989). Panel On Nigeria Since Independence History Project, Vol. VI.

Dr. Lawal Abdulkareem “Adequate Study and Application of Islamic Law: A Mechanism for National Advancement in Nigeria in the 21st Century” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.2 issue 11, pp.182-185 November 2018  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-2-issue-11/182-185.pdf

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Religious and Regional Crisis in the Nigerian Federalism: Problems, Causes and Remedy

Dr. Lawal Abdulkareem – November 2018 Page No.: 186-191

It is on record that the British Colonial authorities under Lord Lugard amalgamated the Northern and Southern Protectorates and the Colony of Lagos into one country with Federal system of Administration since 1914. The immediate problems that confronted that amalgamation were among others, religious differences; diverse ethnic groups; disparity in the physical sizes of the federating units; and above all, the constituent units were not given the choice by the colonial masters to either remain as sovereign entities or join the union. It is against this background that this paper intends to discuss about the problems, causes and remedy to the Religious and Regional Crisis in Nigeria under the structure of Federalism.

Page(s): 186-191                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 06 December 2018

 Dr. Lawal Abdulkareem
Department of Islamic Studies, Faculty of Arts and Islamic Studies, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria

[1]. Abdullahi, A. (2005) ‘True Federalism in 21st Century Nigeria’, see – New Nigerian, Monday and Tuesday, 4 and 5 July 2005.
[2]. Abdullahi, Y.A. (Copyrighted 1968) the Holy Qur’an: Text, Translation and Commentary, Dar al-Arabiyyah, Beirut, Lebanon.
[3]. Alhaji, M.D.A. (2005) ‘Nigeria’s Collapse Inevitable’, see-Weekly Trust, Vol.2, No. 42, Dec. 17- 23, 2005.
[4]. C.A.N. Kaduna Publicity Committee (1987) ‘Kaduna Religious Riot’87’, -A Catalogue of events.
[5]. Council of Ulama’ (1987) ‘The Kafachan Crisis, see- New Nigerian, Thursday, 18 June, 1987.
[6]. David, L.S (1972) International Encyclopedia of the SocialSciences’ Vol. 5, the Macmillan Comp. and the Free Press, New York.
[7]. A., Song (2004) ‘Ethno – Religious Crisis and National Dialogue’, see -New Nigerian Weekly, No 2866, Saturday, 10 July 2004.
[8]. Kevin, E.A. (1999) * Biafra Echoes: Ethnic Activism Moves East’, see- Weekly Trust, vol.2, No 42, December 17 – 23, 1999.
[9]. Lawal, A. (1989) ‘Muslim – Christian Relations: A Case Study ofZuru Emirate’ Unpublished B.A. (Islamic Studies) Project, U.D.U -Sokoto.
[10]. Maitama, S. (2005) ‘Resource Control: Lesson FG Must Learn’, see -New Nigerian, No 13,053, Wednesday,July13,2005.
[11]. Tamuno, T.N and Ukpabi, S.C, (1989). Panel On Nigeria Since Independence History Project, Vol.Vi

Dr. Lawal Abdulkareem “Religious and Regional Crisis in the Nigerian Federalism: Problems, Causes and Remedy” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.2 issue 11, pp.186-191 November 2018  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-2-issue-11/186-191.pdf

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The Politics of Legal Management of Upstream Sector of Oil and Gas in the Production Sharing Contracts by Using Gross Split Systems

Riana Wulandari Ananto, Albertus Sentot Sudarwanto, Yudho Taruno Muryanto – November 2018 Page No.: 192-198

Legal politics in general can be formulated as a series of concepts and principles that form the outline and basis of the plan in the implementation of a job, leadership and ways of acting in the field of law. The legal politics of oil and gas management in Indonesia in its development aims to perfect an existing policy. Oil and gas management contracts in Indonesia have been amended several times, from the changes in the objectives of the parties in this case the government and Contractors oriented to business profits have not been fully realized, seen from each party experiencing losses, For this reason the Government issued a policy to enhance the existing policies by issuing option a new upstream oil and gas business that is a production sharing contract using the gross split system regulated in the Regulation of the Minister of Energy of Mineral Resources Number 8 of 2017. The hope of the goals of the parties that are oriented to business profits in contractual can be realized, especially for the government can achieve the ideals in accordance with mandated by the 1945 Constitution of the Republic of Indonesia. is the size of the return on investment and the profits that will be received by the contractor, very much depends on how efficient the contractor is in running upstream oil and gas operations. The more efficient the contractor, the return on investment and optimal profit will be obtained.

Page(s): 192-198                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 07 December 2018

 Riana Wulandari Ananto
Master Program Of Law, Sebelas Maret University Surakarta, Surakarta, Indonesia

 Albertus Sentot Sudarwanto
Lecturer Master Program of Law Sebelas Maret University, Surakarta, Indonesia

 Yudho Taruno Muryanto
Lecturer Master Program of Law Sebelas Maret University, Surakarta, Indonesia

Books:
[1]. Nasir, Abdul, 2014, The History of Indonesia’s Oil and Gas Fiscal System, Jakarta: Grasindo.
[2]. Salim HS, 2012, Indonesian Mining Law, Jakarta: Raja Grafindo Persada.
[3]. Saleng, Abror, 2004, Legal Mining, Jakarta: Sinar Grafika.
[4]. Sutedi, Adrian, 2011, Legal Mining, Jakarta: Sinar Grafika.
[5]. Widjajono Partowidagdo, 2009, Oil and Gas and Energy in Indonesia: Issues and Policy Analysis, Bandung: Bandung Development Studies Foundation.
Journals:
[6]. Astomo, Putera, 2014, The Establishment of Law in the Framework of National Law Renewal in the Age of Democracy, Journal of the Constitution, Vol. 11, No. 3, September.
[7]. Dewi Tuti Muryati, Bambang Sadano, dan Doddy Kridasaksana, Production Sharing Contract in Relation to Oil and Gas Mining Investment, Research Report, Diponegoro University Alumni Foundation, University of Semarang Faculty of Law.
[8]. Ghadas, Zuhairah Ariff Abd, 2014, Types And Features Of International Ptroleum Contract, South East Asia Journal of Contemporary Business, Economics and Law, Vol. 4, Issue 3 (June) ISSN 2289-1560, p 39.
[9]. Gie, Kwik Kian, 2008, Economic Liberalization Strategy, Reform Review, Journal for Crisis Studies and Mapping, Volume II Number 1 April-June, p 38.
[10]. Kartono, Dynamics of Legal Judicial Review in Indonesia, Journal of Legal Dynamics, Vol 11, Special Edition February 2011, p 17.
[11]. Ogunleye, Taiwo Adebola, 2015, A Legal Analysis of Production Sharing Contract Arrangements in the Nigerian Petroluem Industry. Juornal of Energy Technologies and Policy, Vol.5 No.8 . p. 1
[12]. Putuhena, M. Ilham F, 2015, Politics of Law for the Management of Upstream Oil and Gas After the Decision of the Constitutional Court (Politics of your Upstream Oil law gas management after the Constitutional Court Decision), Rechts Journal Vinding Media National Law Development. Vol. 4 No. 2, August. p 238.
[13]. Rachman, Irfan Nur, 2016, The Political Law of Natural Resource Management According to Article 33 of the 1945 Constitution, Journal of the Constitution, Vol., Vol. 13, No. 1, March. p 196.
[14]. Romadhon, Meiza Topan, 2009, The Regulation of Production Sharing Contract in Oil and Gas Law, Law Journal, No. 1, Vol. January 16, p 89.
[15]. Ronald Z. Titahelu, 1993, The Determination of the Principles of General Law in the Use of Land for the Most People’s Prosperity, Dissertation of the Post-Graduate Program at Airlangga University, Unpublished.
[16]. Qurbani, Indah Dwi, The Politics of Law on Oil and Gas Management in Indonesia, Legal Arena, Vo 6, No 5, August 2012, p 115-116.
[17]. Rahayu, Sang Ayu Putu, The Principles of Law in the Cooperation Contract for Upstream Oil and Gas Business Activities, Yuridika: Volume 32 No. 2, May 2017, p 337.
[18]. Supriyadi, Ali, The Increased Safety of Oil and Gas Business Through the Implementation of the Indonesian National Standard (SNI) and Indonesian National Work Competency Standards (SKKNI), Management Forum, Vol 6, No 4, p 1.
[19]. Sulistyono, The Efforts to Reduce Illegal Retailers in the Distribution of Oil Fuel through Sub-Distributors, Management Forums, Vol 6, No 1, p 14.
[20]. Shobah, Shofia, Hanif Nur Widhiyanti, Patricia Audrey, Cost Recovery in the Oil and Gas Cooperation Contract in Indonesia Viewed from International Contract Law, Faculty of Law Brawijaya University, p 1.
Decision:
[21]. The Decision of the Constitutional Court (MK) No 36 / PUU.X / 2012 November 13, 2012.
Internet:
[22]. BUMI SKK Migas Bulletin, Opens New Hope from the Gross Split scheme, https://skkmigas.go.id/images/upload/file/Bumi_Februari_20177
[23]. Ministry of Information and Information, 2018, New Era of Management of Upstream Oil and Gas http://www.depkes.go.id/article/print/18022000001/era-baru-pengelola-migas-indonesia.html.

Riana Wulandari Ananto, Albertus Sentot Sudarwanto, Yudho Taruno Muryanto “The Politics of Legal Management of Upstream Sector of Oil and Gas in the Production Sharing Contracts by Using Gross Split Systems ” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.2 issue 11, pp.192-198 November 2018  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-2-issue-11/192-198.pdf

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Usage of Media: Is It Impel as a Pull and Push Factor for Behavior of Youth Gangs?

Wijewardhana BVN – November 2018 Page No.: 199-205

The group formation of urban male gangsters is influenced by multiple factors that include their social setting as well as collective psychological behavior. Albert K .Cohen (1964) in his research on delinquent boys, the culture of the gang, attempts to formulate and to solve certain neglected problems. Most of the literature in the field of juvenile delinquency is concerned with the question: Why does this or that boy become delinquent? Cohen’s study argued gangs of boys doing things together: sitting on curbs, standing on the corner, going to the movies, playing ball, smashing windows and going robbery. These things they do are not the simultaneous expression and magical coincidence so many discrete impulses, each with his own history, each fully understandable apart from the others. They are joint activities, deriving their meaning and flavor from the fact of togetherness and governed by a set of common understandings, common sentiments, and common loyalties (Cohen, 1964). This paper try to understand how Medias in society impact to youth gangs and their behavioral patterns. To achieve above purpose 493 youth male were identified as the gang members and data were gathered through observations, questioners, interviews, focus group discussions, case studies. Data has analyzed using Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 and Microsoft SQL server Management Studio 2008.Through findings its clearly visible media has played a role as a pull and push factor for gang behavior.

Page(s): 199-205                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 07 December 2018

 Wijewardhana BVN
Senior Lecturer in Criminology, Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Sri Lanka

[1]. Bureau of Justice Assistance (1997), Addressing Community gang Problems: A Model for Problem Solving. Washington, D.C., U.S. Department of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Assistance
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[3]. Cohen, K., and Short, F. (1958). Research in delinquent sub-cultures. Journal of Social Issues, 14, 20-37.
[4]. Lane, J., & Meeker, J. W. (2000). Subcultural diversity and fear of crime and gangs. Crime and Delinquency, 46, 497-521.SAGE Journals of Crime and Delinquency.
[5]. .National Youth Gang Center (2002),Youth Gang Survey, Summary Report, Washington, DC:US Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention
[6]. SEVANATHA – Urban Resource Centre, Poverty Profile City of Colombo- Urban Poverty Reduction through Community Empowerment, Colombo, Sri Lanka.
[7]. Senaratna, B. & Wijewardana, B., (2012). Risk behaviour of street children in Colombo. Ceylon Medical Journal. 57(3), pp.106–111. DOI: http://doi.org/10.4038/cmj.v57i3.4047
[8]. Thrasher F. (1927). The Gang: A Study of 1,313 Gangs in Chicago, Chicago, University of Chicago Press.
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[10]. wijewardhana, B. (2015). The Impact of Urban Youth Ganging on Anti-Social Behavior: A Criminological Study in Colombo City of Sri Lanka.. [ebook] Available at: http://dr.lib.sjp.ac.lk/handle/123456789/5130 [Accessed 15 Nov. 2018].
[11]. Wijewardhana, N., Samarakoon, M. and Weerawardhana, S. (2018). Urban Youth male gangsters and analyze tendencies for youth to involve in criminal acts through gangs. [ebook] Available at: http://file:///C:/Users/user/Downloads/3-2-29-329%20(11).pdf [Accessed 5 Nov. 2018].
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Wijewardhana BVN “Usage of Media: Is It Impel as a Pull and Push Factor for Behavior of Youth Gangs?” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.2 issue 11, pp.199-205 November 2018  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-2-issue-11/199-205.pdf

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The Impact of Internal Control Challenges on Organizational Financial Performance for Selected Local Government Authorities in Arumeru District, Arusha Tanzania

Dr. Ndalahwa Musa Masanja – November 2018 Page No.: 206-211

The article examines the impact of internal control challenges on financial performance in selected Local government Authority in Arumeru district, Arusha, Tanzania. The study used the descript to-explanatory research design. The study was conducted in three local government authorities wards located in Kikatiti, Majiya Chai and Usa-river. A total of 113 respondents working in those departments were involved in this study. Purposive sampling procedure was used to determine the research participants.The validity of research instrument was determined through content validity index and factorial analysis for construct validity.Reliability was tested by the Cronbach Coefficient Alpha with a result of 0.877. The data analysis will include both descriptive and inferential statistics. Descriptive statistics was be used to analyze the demographic characteristics of research participants. Inferential statistics was used to analyze the relationship between internal control challenges and organizational financial performance in the Local government authorities.The major challenge was unethical behavior of employees, insufficient remuneration and impunity for fraudulent behavior with local government Authority in Arumeru District. However, the participant disagreed that employee pressure, unnoticed misconduct, inadequate fraud control and prevention were among the critical challenges facing the local government authorities in Arumeru District. There was a statistically significant relationship between poor remuneration, inadequate fraud control and prevention, unnoticed misconduct, impunity and organizational financial performance. On the other hand, challenges such as the Employee pressure, Unethical Behavior, and lack of internal control measures were statistically insignificant.

Page(s): 206-211                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 08 December 2018

 Dr. Ndalahwa Musa Masanja
PhD., Lecturer of Accounting and Management, University of Arusha, Tanzania

[1]. Abdul, Y. (2014). Internal control and governance: a case of CCBRT, unpublished masters dissertation.
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[3]. Al-Rawashdeh, H.A., (2017). The role of internal control components in the maintenance of Public funds: applied study on the Jordanian Ministry of Justice-North province as Perceived by the workers of internal control and accounting departments, International Business research, 10(5), 189-201.
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[5]. Brian, M.D. (2013). Effects of internal control on revenue collection: a case of Kenya Revenue Authority, Unpublished research project.
[6]. Bubilek, O. (2017). Importance of internal audit and internal control in an organization-case study, Unpublished degree thesis
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[8]. COSO (2013). Internal control-integrated framework, retrieved on 19th August 2018 from https://na.theiia.org/standards-guidance/topics/Documents/Executive_Summary.pdf
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[15]. Research Paper. University of Nairobi Field, A. (2009) Discovering statistics using SPSS, 3RD Edition. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage
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[17]. Lambert, R. A., Leuz, C., and Verrecchia, R.E. (2007). Accounting information, disclosure, and the cost of capital. Journal of Accounting Research 45 (2): 385–420
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[19]. Makgatho, K.E. (2013). Effectiveness of internal control mechanisms in monitoring financial Resources at the Gauteng department of education, Masters dissertation.
[20]. Moeller, R.R. (2011). COSO enterprise risk management: establishing effective governance, Risk and compliance processes, 2nd, New York, NY: John Wiley & Sons inc.
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[23]. Munene, M.J. (2009). Effects of internal control on financial performance of technical Training institutions in Kenya, Master thesis.
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[25]. Myula, G., (2011). Assessment of factors affecting effectiveness of internal control system of internal control system in local government authorities in Tanzania, (Unpublished masters dissertation)
[26]. National Audit Office Tanzania (2017) Annual General Report of the Controller and Auditor General, Retrived on 17th August, 2018 from http://www.nao.go.tz/?wpfb_dl=249
[27]. Njeri, C.K. (2014) Effect of Internal Controls on the financial performance of manufacturing firms in Kenya (Unpublished Master thesis).
[28]. Ntongo, V. (2012).Internal controls, financial accountability and service delivery in private Health providers of Kampala district, Master dissertation.
[29]. Paraskevi, T. (2016).The effectiveness of internal audit and internal control systems in Greek Banks, masters thesis.
[30]. Petrascu and Tieanu (2014)
[31]. Protiviti (2014). The updated COSO internal control framework, 3rded, Retrieved on 19th August, 2018 from https://www.protiviti.com/sites/default/files/united_states/insights/updated-coso-internal-control-framework-faqs-third-edition-protiviti.pdf
[32]. Ringo, G.N. (2013). Factors affecting implementation of training programs at Dar-es-salaam city council, Tanzania. (Unpublished Masters dissertation).
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[37]. Vuai, M.H. (2014). Assessment of Internal Control system performance in revenue collections in Tanzania: A case study of Zanzibar Municipal Council (Unpublished Masters Dissertation).

Dr. Ndalahwa Musa Masanja “The Impact of Internal Control Challenges on Organizational Financial Performance for Selected Local Government Authorities in Arumeru District, Arusha Tanzania” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.2 issue 11, pp.206-211 November 2018  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-2-issue-11/206-211.pdf

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Evidence Reinforcement of Money Laundering in Criminal Act of Corruption Cases

Dody Witjaksono, Harie Purwadie, Hartiwiningnish – November 2018 Page No.: 212-220

Law enforcement officers should always contribute to combate criminal acts, especially money laundering. One of the law enforcement’s participation is enforcing current applicable law in order to achieve the objective of the law itself. One of the actions of law enforcers especially in deciding a money laundering criminal case is by dropping a criminal to the defendant. The result of the verdict by the Panel of Judges then the Prosecutor as the executor working with the Correctional Institution in carrying out the criminal should get more attention because there is no point in the decision issued by the Panel of Judges without any maximum implementation. In terms of the sanctions, the imposition of criminal sanctions on the crime of money laundering as an extraordinary crime at least provide a deterrent effect for the perpetrators who commit money laundering crime. However, the current reality of money laundering crimes stemming from corruption did not provide a deterrent effect to the perpetrators of criminal acts. the increasingly widespread crime of money laundering derived from criminal corruption perpetrated by state officials shows that there is no clarity whether or not the confiction given to the perpetartors of money laundering is effective.

Page(s): 212-220                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 10 December 2018

 Dody Witjaksono
Law Studies, Universitas Sebelas Maret Surakarta, Indonesia

 Harie Purwadie
Law Studies, Universitas Sebelas Maret Surakarta, Indonesia

 Hartiwiningnish
Law Studies, Universitas Sebelas Maret Surakarta, Indonesia

[1]. Adami Chazawi, 1998, Hukum Pembuktian Tindak Pidana Korupsi, Alumni, Bandung
[2]. Dikutipdari paper untukmendukungdelegasi RI padaforthy-seventh session of the comision on narcotic drugs, yang diselenggarakan di Wina 15-22 Maret 2004
[3]. Fithriadi Muslim & Edi Nasution, 2011, Menjerat Koruptor Dengan Undang-Undang Tindak Pidana Pencucian Uang, Makalahinidisampaikanpada Seminar Nasional dan Dialog Interaktifdengantema ”Apadan Mengapa Tindak Pidana Korupsidan Pencucian Uang Merajalela” yang diselenggarakanoleh Lembaga Pengabdian Kepada Masyarakat (LPKM) Universitas Negeri Padang bekerjasamadengan Pro Justitia Institute Jakarta dan Harian Umum Singgalang di Hotel Pangeran Beach, Padang padatanggal 19 November 2011
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Dody Witjaksono, Harie Purwadie, Hartiwiningnish “Evidence Reinforcement of Money Laundering in Criminal Act of Corruption Cases” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.2 issue 11, pp.212-220 November 2018  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-2-issue-11/212-220.pdf

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Responsibilities of Personal Guarantors in the Event of Dispute of Bankruptcy between Creditors against Debtors

Ericko Priambodo, Dr. Yudho Taruno Muryanto, S.H., M.Hum., Prof Adi Sulistiyono – November 2018 Page No.: 221-226

Many problems faced in business interactions between creditors and debtors in practice e.g. the debtor cannot fulfill its obligations to the creditor. One of them is through the bankruptcy application mechanism at the Commercial Court regulated in Law No. 37 of 2004 concerning Bankruptcy and Delaying Obligations to Pay Debt. Munir Fuady terms bankruptcy to insolvent when the company (or private person) is unable or unwilling to pay its debts. Therefore, rather than the creditor scrambling over the debtor’s assets, the law considers it necessary to regulate it so that debtor debts can be paid in an orderly and fair manner. The type of research in this thesis is including the type of normative legal research. Normative legal research is studies of law that are conceptualized and developed on the basis of the doctrine adopted by the conceptor and / or the developer. There are various legal doctrines developed, ranging from classical doctrine/natural law flow, positivism, historicism, to functionalism realism. This doctrinal method in Indonesia is commonly referred to as a normative research method. The conclusion of this study is that the Personal Guarantor can be bankrupted if the debtor is unable to repay the debt to the creditor on terms and conditions, namely, first, when the personal guarantor does not release his privileges, the bankruptcy request to the person Guarantor can only be done after the creditor has made legal remedies related to the debtor’s assets but the existing assets are not sufficient to repay the debt and the position of the personal guarantor becomes the legal subject of the bankruptcy petitioner who can repay the remaining debts. However, if the personal guarantor has waived his privileges and if the debtor is unable to pay off his debt either legally or non-legally, the Personal Guarantor can be used as a legal subject for the bankruptcy respondent because he has the same position as the debtor in the debt-receivable agreement with the creditor.

Page(s): 221-226                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 10 December 2018

 Ericko Priambodo
Master Degree Program, Sebelas Maret University Surakarta, Indonesia

 Dr. Yudho Taruno Muryanto, S.H., M.Hum.
Master of Law Lecturers in Sebelas Maret University Surakarta, Indonesia

 Prof Adi Sulistiyono
Master of Law Lecturers in Sebelas Maret University Surakarta, Indonesia

Books
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Ericko Priambodo, Dr. Yudho Taruno Muryanto, S.H., M.Hum., Prof Adi Sulistiyono “Responsibilities of Personal Guarantors in the Event of Dispute of Bankruptcy between Creditors against Debtors” International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) vol.2 issue 11, pp.221-226 November 2018  URL: https://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijriss/Digital-Library/volume-2-issue-11/221-226.pdf

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