The Equivalent of Dixon’s Take Subtype of Motion-C Verbs in English and Buginese: Dixon Semantic Approach

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International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS) | Volume V, Issue IX, September 2021 | ISSN 2454–6186

The Equivalent of Dixon’s Take Subtype of Motion-C Verbs in English and Buginese: Dixon Semantic Approach

Nur Hikmah1, Hamzah A. Machmoed2, Harlinah Sahib3
1,2,3English Language Studies-Postgraduate Program, Faculty of Cultural Sciences – Hasanuddin University, Makassar, South Sulawesi, Indonesia

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Abstract: This research aims to (1) identify the motion-c verbs in English and Buginese based on Dixon’s division of Take subtype, and to (2) investigate and analyze both similarities and differences of motion-c verbs of Take subtype in English and Buginese in term of semantic. The data of this research consist of English and Buginese Language. The first data (English) collected from COCA (Corpus of Contemporary American English), and the second data (Buginese) obtained from field research by observing and interviewing. Both data were studied with descriptive and qualitative analysis. The result of this research indicated that (1) there are eight motion-c verbs of Take subtype in English: take, bring, fetch, send, move, raise, steal, and lift. In Buginese data, there are twenty-nine verbs refer to motion-c verbs: mala, majjeppu, mangampai (take); tiwi, mattappi, majjujuug, mangessang, mallempa, makkokkong, mabbiccang, mangule, massoppo, marrenreng, matteteng, matteke, mangepa, maddenge’ (bring); aleng (fetch); makkiring, mappelaluang (send); mesa, lette’, lesse’, soro’ (move); mappenre’ (raise); mennau, majjikkau, mallariang (steal); and mangaka’ (lift). The key differences of motion-c verbs in English and Buginese based on Take subtype can be seen from two aspects: locus role and a stance of moving or the way something moved related to the social culture.

Keywords: Motion-c verbs, semantic types of verbs, social culture, locus.

I. INTRODUCTION

The study of language with a set of rules is known as linguistics. Linguistics has also been well-defined by some linguists. According to Wardhaugh[1], linguistics is the scientific study of language. In addition, Halliday[2] argues that linguistics as the study of how people exchange meaning by ‘languaging’. In brief, linguistics is the study of language associated with how the words are put and arranged together in certain order and how it functions in creating meaning. Furthermore, linguistics is constituted of some disciplines, such as phonology, syntax, morphology, as well as semantics. Linguistics is also a part of language and culture that cannot be separated because they are the social and people behavior’s expressions[3].