Application of Preplanning of Motor Movements and Change of Psychology State in the Management of Stuttering Behaviour among Adolescents

International Journal of Research and Scientific Innovation (IJRSI) | Volume V, Issue IV, April 2018 | ISSN 2321–2705

Application of Preplanning of Motor Movements and Change of Psychology State in the Management of Stuttering Behaviour among Adolescents

Dr. Egaga, Patrick Ikani

  Department of Special Education, Faculty of Education, University of Calabar, Calabar, Nigeria

Abstract: – Stuttering is a major non-fluent speech. It is characterized and therefor becomes manifest by intermittent blocks (prolongations) repetitions/hesitations. It is an enigmatic speech disorder capable of distorting communication and adversely inhibiting social interaction. This study explores the utilization of preplanning of motor movement and change of psychological state as potent instruments for the management of stuttering behavior in adolescents.

Keywords: – Preplanning of motor movements, change of psychology, management of stuttering behaviour among adolescents

I. NATURE, SCOPE AND DEFINITION OF STUTTERING

Stuttering, also known as stammering is a speech disorder in which the flow of speech is disrupted by involuntary repetitions and prolongations of sounds, syllables, words or phrases as well as involuntary silent pauses or blocks in which the person who stutters is unable to produce sounds. The term stuttering is most commonly associated with involuntary sound repetition, but it also encompasses the abnormal hesitation or pausing before speech, referred to by people who stutter as blocks, and the prolongation of certain sounds, usually vowels or semivowels. Stuttering is a disorder of “selection, initiation, and execution of motor sequences necessary for fluent speech production.” For many people who stutter, repetition is the primary problem. The term “stuttering” covers a wide range of severity, encompassing barely perceptible impediments that are largely cosmetic to severe symptoms that effectively prevent oral communication. In the world, approximately four times as many men as women stutter, encompassing 70 million people worldwide or about 1% of the world’s population.

The availability of visible speech in the early 1950s allowed spectrographic analysis of speech disruptions exhibited for less than six months by preschool children labeled as stutterers by their parents. The analyses were then related to the fluency of the children ten years later.

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