Volume V Issue VIII

Relationship for Thrust and Thickness of Stone Pitching Along Side of River

Dr. Birendra Kumar Singh – August 2018 Page No.: 01-04

As discharge of flow increases in river, the thickness of stone pitching alongside of bank of river increases. The thickness of stone pitching provided alongside of river obtained from lateral thrust taking mean velocity of flow into account provides more thickness of stone pitching alongside of the river compared to the lateral thrust obtained from mean depth of flow. The equations for lateral thrust taking into account the velocity of flow and depth of flow with thickness of stone pitching provided alongside of the river are derived.

Page(s): 01-04                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 12 August 2018

 Dr. Birendra Kumar Singh
Civil Engineering Department, Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra, Ranchi-835215 (Jharkhand), India

[1]. A Caroglu, E.R (1972) “Friction factors is solid material systems “J. Hydraulic Div. Am. SOC. Civ. Eng, 98(HY 4),681 – 699
[2]. Alam, A.M.Z. and Kennedy J.F (1969)” Friction factors for flow in sand bed channels “J Hydraulic Div. Am. SOC Civ. Eng 95(HY 6), 1973 – 1992
[3]. Ben Chie Yen F. (January 1.2002) “Open channel flow resistance” Journal of the Hydraulic Engg. Vol 128, No – 1 ASCE, PP,20 – 39
[4]. Bray, D.I. (1979) “Estimating average velocity in gravel bed – rivers “J Hydraulic Div. Am. SOC Civ. Eng. 105 (HY 9), 1103 – 1122
[5]. Bathurst, J.C., Flow Resistance of Large-Scale Roughness,” Journal of the Hydraulics Division, ASCE, Vol. 104, No. HY12, Paper 14239, Dec., 1978, pp.1587.
[6]. Bathurst, J.C., Li, R-M., and Simsons, D.B., Hydraulics of Mountains Rivers, Report No CER78-79JCB-RML-DBS55, Civil Engineering Department, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colo., 1979.
[7]. Bathurst, J.C., “Flow Resistance in Boulder-Bed Streams,” 22-28, 1980. University East Anglia/Institute Hydrology/Colorado State University International Workshop on Engineering Problems in the Management of Gravel Bed Rivers, held atGregyong, Newtown, Wales, U.K. (Proceedings to be Published by John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, N.Y.)
[8]. Charlton, F.G., Brown, P.M., and Benson, R.W., “The Hydraulic Geometry of Some Gravel Rivers in Britain.” Report No. ITI80. Hydraulics Research Station Wallingford, U.K., July 1978.
[9]. Day, T., “The channel Geometry of Mountain Streams.” Mountains Geomorydlogy Olav Slaymaker and H.J. McPherson, eds, Tantalus Research Ltd., B.C., 1972, pp. 141-149.
[10]. Day, T.T., discussion of “Resistance Equation for Alluvial-Channel Flow,” by D.E. Burkham and D.R. Dawdy, Journal of the Hydraulics Division, ASCE, Vol. 103, No. HY5. Proc. Paper 12896, May, 1977, pp. 582-584.
[11]. Dey S, Raikar R.V. (2007) “Characteristic of loose rough boundary streams at near threshold” Journal of Hydraulic Engg. ASCE 133(3), 288-304
[12]. Flammer, G.H., Tullis,J. Mason, E.S., “Free Surface Velocity Gradient Flow Past Hemisphere,” Journal of the Hydraulics Division, ASCE, Vol. 96, No.HY7, Proc Paper 7418, July, 1970, pp.1485-1502.
[13]. Golubtsov, V.V., “Hydraulic Resistance and Formula for Computing the Average Flow Velocity of Mountain Rivers,” Soviet Hydrology: Selected Papers, American Geophysical Union, No. 5, 1969, pp. 500-511.
[14]. Griffiths, G.A. (1981) “Flow resistance in course gravel bed rivers “J. Hydraulic Div. An soc. Civ. Eng. 107 (HY – 7), 899 – 918
[15]. Hartung, F., and Scheuerlein. H., “Macroturbulent Flow in Steep Open Channels with High Natural Roughness,” Proceedings of the Twelfih Congress of the International Association for Hydraulic Research, Fort Collins, Colo., Vol, 1, Sept., 1967, pp, 1-8.
[16]. Herbich, J.B., and Shulits, S., “Large-Scale Roughness in Open Channel Flow,” Journal of the Hydraulics Division, ASCE, Vol. 90, No. HY6, Proc. Paper 4105, Nov., 1964, pp, 203-230.
[17]. Hey, R.D., “Flow Resistance in Gravel-Bed Rivers,” Journal of the Hydraulics Division, ASCE, Vol. 105, No. HY4, Proc. Paper 14500, Apr., 1979, pp, 365-379.
[18]. Hey R.D (1979) “Flow resistance in gravel bed rivers “J Hydraulic Div Am SOC CIV Eng, 105 ( HY – 4), 365 – 379.
[19]. Johansson, C.E., “Orientation of Pebbles in Running Water,” Geografiska Anneler, Vol. 45, Stockholan, Sweden, 1963, pp,85-112.
[20]. Judd, H.E., and Peterson, D.F.., “Hydraulics of Large Bed Element Channels,” Report No. PRWG 17-6, Utah Water Research Laboratory, Utah State University, Logan, Utah, 1969.
[21]. James C. Bathurst (December 1981) “Resistance Equation for Large Scale Roughness “Journal of the Hydraulics Division, ASCE, Vol 107 NOHY-12, pp 1593-1613.
[22]. James C. Batharst (December 1981) “Resistance Equation for Large Scale Roughness” Journal of the Hydraulics Division, American Society of Civil Engineers, Vol. 107 NO HY 12, PP 1593-1613.
[23]. James C. Bathurst (December 1978) “ Flow resistance of large-scale roughness “Journal
of the Hydraulic Division Vol 104NO12PP1587-1603
[24]. J. Aberle and G.M. Smart (2003) “The influence of roughness structures on flow resistance on steep slopes”, Journal of Hydraulic Research Vol 41, Issue 3, Available
online 01 Feb 2010,259-269
[25]. Kellerhals, R., “Runoff Routing Through Steep Natural Streams,” Journal of the Hydraulics Division, ASCE, Vol. 96, No. HY11, Proc. Paper 7666, Nov., 1970, pp,2201-2217.
[26]. LI, R-M., Simons, D.B., Ward, T.J., and Steele, K.S., “Phase 1 Report: Hydraulic Model Study of Flow Control Structures,” Report No. CER77-78RML-DBS-TJW, KSS15, Department of Civil Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colo., Nov.,1977.
[27]. Lovera, F. and kennedy J.F (1969) “Friction factors for flat – bed flows in sand channel” J Hydraulic Div, Am. Soc. CivEng 95 (HY 4) 1227 – 1234.
[28]. Miller, J.P., “High Mountain Streams: Effects of Geology on Channel Characteristics and Bed Material,” Memoir No. 4, State Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, N.M., 1958.
[29]. Peterson, D.F., and Mohanty, P.K., “Flume Studies of Flow in Steep, Rough Channels,” Journal of the Hydraulics Division, ASCE, Vol. 86, HY9, Proc. Paper 2653, Nov., 1960, pp,55-76.
[30]. Petryk, S. and shen, H.W (1971) “Direct measurement of shear stream in a flume, “JHydraulic Div. Am. SOC. Civ. Eng. 97(HY – 6), 883 – 887
[31]. Thompson, S.M. and Campbell, P.L. (1979) “Hydraulics of a large channel paved with boulders” J. Hydraulics Research, 17(4), 341-354
[32]. Van RiJn, L.C. (1982), “Equivalent roughness of alluvial bed” J Hydraulics Div, Am, SOC.Civ.Eng. 108 (HY10), 1215-1218
[33]. Whiting P.J; and Dietrich W.E. (1990) “Boundary Shear Stress and roughness over mobile alluvial beds” J Hydraulic Engg 116(12), 1495-01511

Dr. Birendra Kumar Singh “Relationship for Thrust and Thickness of Stone Pitching Along Side of River” International Journal of Research and Scientific Innovation (IJRSI) vol.5 issue 8, pp.01-04 August 2018  URL: http://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijrsi/digital-library/volume-5-issue-8/01-04.pdf

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Energy and Climate Change – A Global Challenge
Dr D N Naresh and Vaibhav Singh – August 2018 – Page No.: 05-08

Change in climate is raising alarms towards the usage of Energy globally. It is difficult to comprehend as to the certainty of how technological possibility will play out in the future to provide a balance for the need for survival vis-à-vis embracing the environmental concerns. Given the attention attained by the need for energy and the impact on environment due to pollution.
In the coming years developing countries will face great challenges in development and its impact on environment. The path of development chosen by the region, upon which lies the future growth of energy and emission trajectories, would be greatly influenced by technological developments, economic cooperation between countries, and global cooperation in mitigation and adaptation of change in climate.
Environment and climate change is one of the most important global challenges, with implications for food production, water supply, health, energy, etc. Addressing climate change requires a good scientific understanding as well as coordinated action at national and global level. This paper addresses these challenges. Historically, the responsibility for greenhouse gas emissions’ increase lies largely with the industrialized world, though the developing countries are likely to be the source of an increasing proportion of future emissions. The projected environmental and climate change under various scenarios is likely to have implications on food production, water supply, coastal settlements, forest ecosystems, health, energy security, etc. The adaptive capacity of communities likely to be impacted by climate change is low in developing countries.

Page(s): 05-08                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 11 August 2018

 Dr D N Naresh
Director & Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Asians Institute of Technology, Tonk (Rajasthan), India

 Vaibhav Singh
Assistant Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, AIT, Tonk (Rajasthan) India

[1]. Shukla, P. R., Rana, A., Garg, A., Kapshe, M. and Nair R., Climate Change Assessment for India: Applications of Asia Pacific Integrated Model (AIM), Universities Press, Hyderabad, 2004
[2]. Garg, A., Ghosh, D. and Shukla, P. R., Energy sector policies and mitigation of GHG emissions from India. In Climate Change Economics and Policy: Indian Perspectives (ed. Toman M.), Resources for the Future Publication, Washington DC, 2003.
[3]. Nair, R., Shukla, P. R., Kapshe, M., Garg, A. and Rana, A., Analysis of long-term energy and carbon emission scenarios for India. In Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, 2003, vol. 8, pp. 53–69.).
[4]. Loske, R., Scope of the Report: Setting the Stage: Climate Change and Sustainable Development, Third Assessment Report of Working Group III to Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 1996.
[5]. India’s Initial National Communications to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, Ministry of Environment and Forests, New Delhi, 2004.
[6]. Rupa Kumar, K. et al., High-resolution climate change scenarios for India for the 21st century. Curr. Sci., 2005, 90, 334–345.
[7]. Ravindranath, N. H., Joshi, N. V., Sukumar, R. and Saxena, A., Impact of climate change on forests in India. Curr. Sci., 2005, 90, 354–361.
[8]. Indian Vision 2020, SP Gupta Committee Report. Planning Commission, New Delhi, 2002.
[9]. Climate Change 2001: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability, Summary for Policy Makers and Technical Summary of the Working Group II Report, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (2001), Geneva, Switzerland, IPCC.
[10]. Climate Change 2001: Mitigation, Summary for Policy Makers and Technical Summary of the Working Group III Report, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Geneva, Switzerland, 2001.
[11]. Falkenmark, Malin, (2007), “Global Warming: Water the Main Mediator”, Stockholm Water Front, Vol 2, June 2007, Stockholm International Water Institute, Stockholm
[12]. Prabhu, Aneesh and Swami Venkataraman, (2007), “Global Carbon Emissions and Economic Growth”, Environment, October-November 2007
[13]. Washington Post-ET, (2007), “Journalists should note portray global warming as a morality tale”, Economic Times, 17th August 2007
[14]. WEO, (2006), “World Energy Outlook”, International Energy Agency
[15]. Agarwal, J.D. and Aman Agarwal “Climate Change, Energy and Sustainable Development”

Dr D N Naresh and Vaibhav Singh “Energy and Climate Change – A Global Challenge” International Journal of Research and Scientific Innovation (IJRSI) vol.5 issue 8, pp.05-08 August 2018 URL: http://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijrsi/digital-library/volume-5-issue-8/05-08.pdf

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Niosome in Ocular Drug Delivery: An Update Review
Savita More*, Namita Phalke, Sarika Lokhande, Snehal Badadare, Vijay Raje- August 2018 – Page No.: 09-17

With the recent advancement in the field of ocular therapy, drug delivery approaches have been superior to a new concept in terms of nonionic surfactant vesicles (NSVs), that is, the ability to deliver the therapeutic agent to a patient in a staggered profile. However the major drawbacks of the conventional drug delivery system like lacking of permeability through ocular barrier and poor bioavailability of water soluble drugs have been overcome by the emergence of NSVs. Niosomes have the same potential advantages of phospholipid vesicles (liposomes) of being able to accommodate both water soluble and lipid soluble drug molecules control their release and as such serve as versatile drug delivery devices of numerous applications. The drug loaded NSVs (DNSVs) can be fabricated by simple and cost-effective techniques with improved physical stability and enhance bioavailability without blurring the vision. The increasing research interest surrounding this delivery system has widened the areas of pharmaceutics in particular with many more subdisciplines expected to coexist in the near future. This review gives a comprehensive emphasis on NSVs considerations, formulation approaches, physicochemical properties, fabrication techniques, and therapeutic significances of NSVs in the field of ocular delivery and also addresses the future development of modified NSVs.

Page(s): 09-17                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 11 August 2018

 Savita More
GES College of Pharmacy (D. Pharm), Limb, Satara, Maharashtra, India

 Namita Phalke
GES College of Pharmacy (D. Pharm), Limb, Satara, Maharashtra, India

 Sarika Lokhande
GES College of Pharmacy (D. Pharm), Limb, Satara, Maharashtra, India

 Snehal Badadare
GES College of Pharmacy (D. Pharm), Limb, Satara, Maharashtra, India

 Vijay Raje
GES College of Pharmacy (D. Pharm), Limb, Satara, Maharashtra, India

[1]. Saettone M, Salminen L. Ocular inserts for topical delivery. Adv Drug Deliv Rev. 1995; 16(1):95-106.
[2]. Arora S, Prashar B, Dhamija H. Niosome: the unique vesicular drug carriers. J Drug Del Ther. 2012; 28(2):96–101.
[3]. Rathore K. In situ gelling ophthalmic drug delivery system: An overview. Int J Pharm Sci. 2010; 2(4):30-34.
[4]. Gaudana R, Jwala S, Boddu, S, Mitra K. Recent perspectives in ocular drug delivery Pharma. Res. 2009; 26(5):1197–1216.
[5]. Gannu P, Rajeshwarrao P. Nonionic surfactant vesicular systems for effective drug delivery an overview. Acta Pharm Sin B. 2011; 1(4):208–219.
[6]. Modi K, Shelat P. Applications of novel vesicular drug delivery system as ocular drug vehicles: a review. IJPRBS. 2012; 12(3):4554–4561.
[7]. Vaddavalli P, Garg P, Sharma S, Sangwan S, Rao G, Thomas R. Role of confocal microscopy in the diagnosis of fungal acanthamoeba keratitis. Ophthalmology. 2011; 118(4):29–35.
[8]. Bruntn L, Lazo J, Parker K. Goodman & Gilman. The pharmacological basis of therapeutics McGraw-Hill Medical publishing Division.2009:1707-1739.
[9]. Kaur IP, Singh M, Kanwar M. Formulation and evaluation of ophthalmic preparations of acetazolamide.Int J Pharm. 2000; 199(2):119-27.
[10]. Sharma S. Diagnosis of infectious diseases of the eye .Eye (Lond). 2012; 26(2): 177–184.
[11]. Thomas P. Current Perspectives on ophthalmic mycoses. Clin Microbiol Rev. 2003; 16(4): 730–797.
[12]. Kaur I, Rana C, singh H. Development of effective ocular preparations of antifungal agents. J Ocul Pharmacol Ther. 2008; 24(5):481-493.
[13]. Campos M, Diebold Y, Carvalho E, Sanchez A, Jos M. Chitosan nanoparticles as new ocular drug delivery systems: In vitro stability in vivo fate, and cellular toxicity. Pharm Res. 2004; 21(5):803-10
[14]. Budai L, Hajda M, Budai M, Graf P, Baoni S, Noszail B. Gels and liposomes in optimized ocular drug delivery studies on ciprofloxacin formulations. Int J Pharm. 2007; 343(1):34-40.
[15]. Robinson JC.Mitra AK, editors. Ophthalmic Drug Delivery Systems; Marcel Dekker. New York.,USA.Ocular anatomy and physiology relevant to ocular drug delivery. 1993: 29– 35.
[16]. Li G, Shun H, Shen J. Self-assembled liquid crystalline nanoparticles as a novel ophthalmic delivery system for dexamethasone: Improving preocular retention and ocular bioavailability. Int J Pharm. 2010; 396(1):179–187.
[17]. Watsky M, Jablonski, M., Edelhauser H. Comparison of conjunctival and cornral surface areas in rabbit and human. Curr Eye Res.1988; 7(2): 483-486.
[18]. Azeem A, Anwer, K, Talegaonkar, S. Niosomes in sustained and targeted drug delivery: some recent advances. J Drug Target. 2009; 17(1):671-689.
[19]. Ranjan K, Sahoo N, Guha A, Sahoo N. Nonionic surfactant vesicles in ocular delivery: innovative approaches and perspectives . J Biomed Biotechnol. 2014; 12(3):439-445.
[20]. Bachhav K, Mondon, Y, Kalia, R, Gurny M. Novel micelle formulations to increase cutaneous bioavailability of azole antifungals. J Control Release. 2011; 153(4) 126–132
[21]. Baillie A, Florence A, Hume L, Muirhead G , Rogerson A. The preparation and properties of niosomes-non-ionic surfactant vesicles. J Pharm Pharmacol.1985; 37(12):863–868.
[22]. Lang JC, Roehrs RE, Rodeheavers DP, Missel PJ, Jani R, Chauhan MA. Banker GS, Rhodes CT, editors. Modern Pharmaceutics; Marcel Dekker Inc., New York, USA. Design and evaluation of ophthalmic pharmaceutical products. 4th edition. 2002:418-481.
[23]. Uchegbu I, Vyas S. Non-ionic surfactant based vesicles (niosomes) in drug delivery. Int J Pharm.1998; 172(2):33–70.
[24]. Tamhankar M. Niosomes novel drug delivery system.The Eastern Pharmacist.1995; 39(2):84-88.
[25]. Bhaskaran S, Lakshmi K .Comparative evaluation of niosome formulations prepared by different techniques. Acta Pharm Sin B. 2009; 51(5):27–30.
[26]. Baillie A, Coombs G, Dillan G, Laurio J. Non-ionic surfactant vesicles, niosomes as a delivery system for the anti-leishmanial drug Sodium stibogluconate. J Pharm Pharmacol. 1980; 38(2):502.
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Savita More*, Namita Phalke, Sarika Lokhande, Snehal Badadare, Vijay Raje”Niosome in Ocular Drug Delivery: An Update Review ” International Journal of Research and Scientific Innovation (IJRSI) vol.5 issue 8, pp. 09-17 August 2018 URL: http://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijrsi/digital-library/volume-5-issue-8/09-17.pdf

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Section Factor with Respect to Surface Roughness

Dr. Birendra Kumar Singh – August 2018 Page No.: 18-21

The relationship for section factor AR2/3 with different roughness coefficient are established and the section factor is determined with respect to the derived equations with respect to maximum mean depth of flow and minimum velocity of flow. We find that the value of section factor is more with respect to maximum depth of flow as compared to minimum depth of flow because section factor depends upon mean depth of flow. As we have more mean depth of flow, it indicates more discharge of flow. Hence, section factor is more but we get less mean depth of flow with respect to minimum velocity of flow.

Page(s): 18-21                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 12 August 2018

 Dr. Birendra Kumar Singh
Civil Engineering Department, Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra, Ranchi-835215 (Jharkhand), India

[1]. A Caroglu, E.R (1972) “Friction factors is solid material systems “J. Hydraulic Div. Am. SOC. Civ. Eng, 98(HY 4),681 – 699
[2]. Alam, A.M.Z. and Kennedy J.F (1969)” Friction factors for flow in sand bed channels “J Hydraulic Div. Am. SOC Civ. Eng 95(HY 6), 1973 – 1992
[3]. Ben Chie Yen F. (January 1.2002) “Open channel flow resistance” Journal of the Hydraulic Engg. Vol 128, No – 1 ASCE, PP,20 – 39
[4]. Bray, D.I.(1979) “Estimating average velocity in gravel bed – rivers “J Hydraulic Div.
Am. SOC Civ. Eng. 105 (HY 9), 1103 – 1122
[5]. Bathurst, J.C., Flow Resistance of Large-Scale Roughness,” Journal of the Hydraulics Division, ASCE, Vol. 104, No. HY12, Paper 14239, Dec., 1978, pp.1587.
[6]. Bathurst, J.C., Li, R-M., and Simsons, D.B., Hydraulics of Mountains Rivers, Report No. CER78-79JCB-RML-DBS55, Civil Engineering Department, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colo., 1979.
[7]. Bathurst, J.C., “Flow Resistance in Boulder-Bed Streams,” 22-28, 1980. University East Anglia/Institute Hydrology/Colorado State University International Workshop on Engineering Problems in the Management of Gravel Bed Rivers, held atGregyong, Newtown, Wales, U.K. (Proceedings to be Published by John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, N.Y.)
[8]. Charlton, F.G., Brown, P.M., and Benson, R.W., “The Hydraulic Geometry of Some Gravel Rivers in Britain.” Report No. ITI80. Hydraulics Research Station Wallingford, U.K., July 1978.
[9]. Day, T., “The channel Geometry of Mountain Streams.” Mountains Geomorydlogy Olav Slaymaker and H.J. McPherson, eds, Tantalus Research Ltd., B.C., 1972, pp. 141-149.
[10]. Day, T.T., discussion of “Resistance Equation for Alluvial-Channel Flow,” by D.E. Burkham and D.R. Dawdy, Journal of the Hydraulics Division, ASCE, Vol. 103, No. HY5. Proc. Paper 12896, May, 1977, pp. 582-584.
[11]. Dey S, Raikar R.V. (2007) “Characteristic of loose rough boundary streams at near threshold” Journal of Hydraulic Engg. ASCE 133(3), 288-304
[12]. Flammer, G.H., Tullis,J. Mason, E.S., “Free Surface Velocity Gradient Flow Past Hemisphere,” Journal of the Hydraulics Division, ASCE, Vol. 96, No.HY7, Proc Paper 7418, July, 1970, pp.1485-1502.
[13]. Golubtsov, V.V., “Hydraulic Resistance and Formula for Computing the Average Flow Velocity of Mountain Rivers,” Soviet Hydrology: Selected Papers, American Geophysical
Union, No. 5, 1969, pp. 500-511.
[14]. Griffiths, G.A. (1981) “Flow resistance in course gravel bed rivers “J. Hydraulic Div. An soc. Civ. Eng. 107 (HY – 7), 899 – 918
[15]. Hartung, F., and Scheuerlein. H., “Macroturbulent Flow in Steep Open Channels with High Natural Roughness,” Proceedings of the Twelfih Congress of the International Association for Hydraulic Research, Fort Collins, Colo., Vol, 1, Sept., 1967, pp, 1-8.
[16]. Herbich, J.B., and Shulits, S., “Large-Scale Roughness in Open Channel Flow,” Journal of the Hydraulics Division, ASCE, Vol. 90, No. HY6, Proc. Paper 4105, Nov., 1964, pp, 203-230.
[17]. Hey, R.D., “Flow Resistance in Gravel-Bed Rivers,” Journal of the Hydraulics Division, ASCE, Vol. 105, No. HY4, Proc. Paper 14500, Apr., 1979, pp, 365-379.
[18]. Hey R.D (1979) “Flow resistance in gravel bed rivers “J Hydraulic Div Am SOC CIV Eng, 105 ( HY – 4), 365 – 379.
[19]. Johansson, C.E., “Orientation of Pebbles in Running Water,”GeografiskaAnneler, Vol. 45, Stockholan, Sweden, 1963, pp,85-112.
[20]. Judd, H.E., and Peterson, D.F.., “Hydraulics of Large Bed Element Channels,” Report No. PRWG 17-6, Utah Water Research Laboratory, Utah State University, Logan, Utah, 1969.
[21]. James C. Bathurst (December 1981) “Resistance Equation for Large Scale Roughness “Journal of the Hydraulics Division, ASCE, Vol 107 NOHY-12, pp 1593-1613.
[22]. James C. Batharst (December 1981) “Resistance Equation for Large Scale Roughness” Journal of the Hydraulics Division, American Society of Civil Engineers, Vol. 107 NO HY 12, PP 1593-1613.
[23]. James C. Bathurst (December 1978) “Flow resistance of large-scale roughness “Journal of the Hydraulic Division Vol 104NO12PP1587-1603
[24]. J. Aberle and G.M. Smart (2003) “The influence of roughness structures on flow resistance on steep slopes”, Journal of Hydraulic Research Vol 41, Issue 3, Available
online 01 Feb 2010,259-269
[25]. Kellerhals, R., “Runoff Routing Through Steep Natural Streams,” Journal of the ‘Hydraulics Division, ASCE, Vol. 96, No. HY11, Proc. Paper 7666, Nov., 1970, pp,2201-2217.
[26]. LI, R-M., Simons, D.B., Ward, T.J., and Steele, K.S., “Phase 1 Report: Hydraulic Model Study of Flow Control Structures,” Report No. CER77-78RML-DBS-TJW,KSS15, Department of Civil Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colo., Nov., 1977.
[27]. Lovera, F. and kennedy J.F (1969) “Friction factors for flat – bed flows in sand channel” J Hydraulic Div., Am. Soc. CivEng 95 (HY 4) 1227 – 1234.
[28]. Miller, J.P., “High Mountain Streams: Effects of Geology on Channel Characteristics and Bed Material,” Memoir No. 4, State Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, N.M., 1958.
[29]. Peterson, D.F., and Mohanty, P.K., “Flume Studies of Flow in Steep, Rough Channels,” Journal of the Hydraulics Division, ASCE, Vol. 86, HY9, Proc. Paper 2653, Nov., 1960, pp,55- 76.
[30]. Petryk, S. and shen, H.W (1971) “Direct measurement of shear stream in a flume, “J Hydraulic Div. Am. SOC. Civ. Eng. 97(HY – 6), 883 – 887
[31]. Thompson, S.M. and Campbell, P.L. (1979) “Hydraulics of a large channel paved with boulders” J. Hydraulics Research, 17(4), 341-354
[32]. Van RiJn, L.C. (1982), “Equivalent roughness of alluvial bed” J Hydraulics Div, Am, SOC.Civ.Eng. 108 (HY10), 1215-1218
[33]. Whiting P.J; and Dietrich W.E. (1990) “Boundary Shear Stress and roughness over mobile alluvial beds” J Hydraulic Engg 116(12), 1495-01511

Dr. Birendra Kumar Singh “Section Factor with Respect to Surface Roughness” International Journal of Research and Scientific Innovation (IJRSI) vol.5 issue 8, pp.18-21 August 2018  URL: http://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijrsi/digital-library/volume-5-issue-8/18-21.pdf

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Upgradation of SCADA System at SLDC, Bhopal
Ishita Verma – August 2018 – Page No.: 22-27

Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition and Programmable Logic Controller are presently the most effective automotive systems used around the world for both establishing communication and monitoring the process along with supervision and recording information at from various data location scattered either at remote or in vicinity plant locations. Recent technological shift had find its suitability in Power plant like, Thermal, Gas, Hydro, Wind, Solar and other electricity generation sources. It is mainly effective in monitoring the electrical parameters (like voltage, current, power factor, Power etc) & controlling any fault occurs in electrical distribution system. This paper attempts to analyze the existing network of Regional LDC, for example WRLDC that are mainly under responsibility of POSCO which is under ownership of PGCIL.
Main & Backup Control Centers WRLDC are located at MPPTCL, GETCO, CSPTCL and GSED along with SCADA Systems at Union territories of Daman Diu (DDED) & Dadra Nagar Haveli (DNHED) and are able to perform all the functions of the Main control Centre except DTS and DDS. The system has been designed for meeting identified expansion requirements of present and future capacity calculated from archived data.

Page(s): 22-27                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 12 August 2018

 Ishita Verma
BE-VII Semester, Electronic and Telecommunications Engg Dept, LNCT, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India

[1]. Up gradation of Existing SCADA/EMS Systems at WRLDC and SLDCs of Western Region by PGCIL.
[2]. “PLC SCADA based Distribution Monitoring & Control” by Santosh B.Belekar, Abhijit A. Desai , Megharaj H. Parit, Prof. Anup Dakre at K.J College of Engineering & Management Research published in MJRET (ISSN:2348-6953).
[3]. About SCADA retrieved from https://inductiveautomation.com/what-is-scada; accessed on 01st August 2018

Ishita Verma “Upgradation of SCADA System at SLDC, Bhopal” International Journal of Research and Scientific Innovation (IJRSI) vol.5 issue 8, pp.22-27 August 2018 URL: http://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijrsi/digital-library/volume-5-issue-8/22-27.pdf

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Effect of Roughness on Conveyance of Channel
Dr. Birendra Kumar Singh – August 2018 – Page No.: 28-32

The effect of surface roughness (i.e. Manning’s roughness coefficient, Darcy Weisbach resistance coefficient) is studied on conveyance or channel carrying capacity of channel. Also the effect of roughness due to size of the roughness material is seen on conveyance on channel. Velocity is much reduced with respect to Darcy Weisbach resistance coefficient as compared to Manning’s roughness coefficient.

Page(s): 28-32                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 13 August 2018

 Dr. Birendra Kumar Singh
Civil Engineering Department, Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra, Ranchi-835215 (Jharkhand), India

[1]. A Caroglu, E.R (1972) “Friction factors is solid material systems “J. Hydraulic Div. Am. SOC. Civ. Eng, 98(HY 4), 681 – 699
[2]. Alam, A.M.Z. and Kennedy J.F (1969)” Friction factors for flow in sand bed channels “J Hydraulic Div. Am. SOC Civ. Eng 95(HY 6), 1973 – 1992
[3]. Ben Chie Yen F. (January 1.2002) “Open channel flow resistance” Journal of the Hydraulic Engg. Vol 128, No – 1 ASCE, PP,20 – 39
[4]. Bray, D.I.(1979) “Estimating average velocity in gravel bed – rivers “J Hydraulic Div. Am. SOC Civ. Eng. 105 (HY 9), 1103 – 1122
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[6]. Bathurst, J.C., Li, R-M., and Simsons, D.B., Hydraulics of Mountains Rivers, Report No. CER78-79JCB-RML-DBS55, Civil Engineering Department, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colo., 1979.
[7]. Bathurst, J.C., “Flow Resistance in Boulder-Bed Streams,” 22-28, 1980. University East Anglia/Institute Hydrology/Colorado State University International Workshop on Engineering Problems in the Management of Gravel Bed Rivers, held at Gregyong, Newtown, Wales, U.K. (Proceedings to be Published by John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, N.Y.)
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[9]. Day, T., “The channel Geometry of Mountain Streams.” Mountains Geomorydlogy Olav Slaymaker and H.J. McPherson, eds, Tantalus Research Ltd., B.C., 1972, pp. 141-149.
[10]. Day, T.T., discussion of “Resistance Equation for Alluvial-Channel Flow,” by D.E. Burkham and D.R. Dawdy, Journal of the Hydraulics Division, ASCE, Vol. 103, No. HY5 .Proc. Paper 12896, May, 1977, pp. 582-584.
[11]. Dey S, Raikar R.V. (2007) “Characteristic of loose rough boundary streams at near threshold” Journal of Hydraulic Engg. ASCE 133(3), 288-304
[12]. Flammer, G.H., Tullis,J. Mason, E.S., “Free Surface Velocity Gradient Flow Past Hemisphere,” Journal of the Hydraulics Division, ASCE, Vol. 96, No.HY7, Proc Paper 7418, July, 1970, pp.1485-1502.
[13]. Golubtsov, V.V., “Hydraulic Resistance and Formula for Computing the Average Flow Velocity of Mountain Rivers,” Soviet Hydrology: Selected Papers, American Geophysical Union, No. 5, 1969, pp. 500-511.
[14]. Griffiths, G.A. (1981) “Flow resistance in course gravel bed rivers “J. Hydraulic Div. An soc. Civ. Eng. 107 (HY – 7), 899 – 918
[15]. Hartung, F., and Scheuerlein. H., “Macroturbulent Flow in Steep Open Channels with High Natural Roughness,” Proceedings of the Twelfih Congress of the International Association for Hydraulic Research, Fort Collins, Colo., Vol, 1, Sept., 1967, pp, 1-8.
[16]. Herbich, J.B., and Shulits, S., “Large-Scale Roughness in Open Channel Flow,” Journal of the Hydraulics Division, ASCE, Vol. 90, No. HY6, Proc. Paper 4105, Nov., 1964, pp, 203-230.
[17]. Hey, R.D., “Flow Resistance in Gravel-Bed Rivers,” Journal of the Hydraulics Division, ASCE, Vol. 105, No. HY4, Proc. Paper 14500, Apr., 1979, pp, 365-379.
[18]. Hey R.D (1979) “Flow resistance in gravel bed rivers “J Hydraulic Div Am SOC CIV Eng, 105 (HY – 4), 365 – 379.
[19]. Johansson, C.E., “Orientation of Pebbles in Running Water,” Geografiska Anneler, Vol. 45, Stockholan, Sweden, 1963, pp,85-112.
[20]. Judd, H.E., and Peterson, D.F.., “Hydraulics of Large Bed Element Channels,” Report No. PRWG 17-6, Utah Water Research Laboratory, Utah State University, Logan, Utah, 1969.
[21]. James C. Bathurst (December 1981) “Resistance Equation for Large Scale Roughness “Journal of the Hydraulics Division, ASCE, Vol 107 NOHY-12, pp 1593-1613.
[22]. James C. Batharst (December 1981) “Resistance Equation for Large Scale Roughness” Journal of the Hydraulics Division, American Society of Civil Engineers, Vol. 107 NO HY 12, PP 1593-1613.
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[24]. J. Aberle and G.M. Smart (2003) “The influence of roughness structures on flow resistance on steep slopes”, Journal of Hydraulic Research Vol 41, Issue 3, Available online 01 Feb 2010,259-269
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[26]. LI, R-M., Simons, D.B., Ward, T.J., and Steele, K.S., “Phase 1 Report: Hydraulic Model Study of Flow Control Structures,” Report No.CER77-78RML-DBS-TJW, KSS15, Department of Civil Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colo., Nov., 1977.
[27]. Lovera, F. and kennedy J.F (1969) “Friction factors for flat – bed flows in sand channel” J Hydraulic Div., Am. Soc. CivEng 95 (HY 4) 1227 – 1234.
[28]. Miller, J.P., “High Mountain Streams: Effects of Geology on Channel Characteristics and Bed Material,” Memoir No. 4, State Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, N.M., 1958.
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Dr. Birendra Kumar Singh “Effect of Roughness on Conveyance of Channel” International Journal of Research and Scientific Innovation (IJRSI) vol.5 issue 8, pp. 28-32 August 2018 URL: http://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijrsi/digital-library/volume-5-issue-8/28-32.pdf

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Loss and Delay Multi Server State Dependent Queue with Discouragement, Additional Server and No-Passing

Pankaj Sharma – August 2018 Page No.: 33-48

This study deals with loss and delay multi-server no passing queueing system with discouragement. To reduce the balking behaviour of the customers in case of long queue, we incorporate additional removable servers. The customers arrive according to Poisson process and departs from the system in the same chronological order in which they join the system, due to nopassing restriction. The service facility consists of s permanent and r additional removable heterogeneous servers. The service times of the customers are exponentially distributed. The departing constraint categorizes customers in two types (i) the customers having zero service time and (ii) the customers having exponentially distributed service time. By stating the state dependent rates, the product type solution for queue size distribution at equilibrium. The analytical formulae for the expected waiting time and the difference between the expected waiting times of both type of customers are also derived. To examine the effect of variation of parameters, the sensitivity analysis is carried out. Numerical results are tabulated and displayed graphically so as to explore the advantage of additional removable servers on the performance metrics.

Page(s): 33-48                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 14 August 2018

 Pankaj Sharma
Department of Mathematics, School of Science, Noida International University, G. B. Nagar, G. Noida, India

[1]. Haviv, M. and Ritov, Y. (2001): Homogeneous customers renege from invisible queues at random times under deteriorating waiting conditions, queueing systems: theory and applications., Vol. 38, No. 4, pp. 495-508.
[2]. Jain, M. (1998): Finite population loss and delay queueing system with nopassing,Opsearch., Vol. 35, No. 3, pp. 261-276.
[3]. Jain, M. (2002): M/M/m queue with discouragement and additional server, Application and teaching of Mathematic for Engineers and Statisis. (Ed. M. Saleem), Allied Publishers Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi, pp. 123-134.
[4]. Jain, M. and Ghimire, R. P. (1999): M/M/m/K queue with nopassing and additional servers, Journal Of M. A. C. T., Vol. 32, pp. 13-21.
[5]. Makaddis, G. S. and Zaki, S. Si. (1983): The problem of queueing system m/m/1 with additional servers for a longer queue, Indian J. Pure. Appl. Math., Vol. 14, No. 37, pp. 345-354.
[6]. Pankaj Sharma(2013): Single unreliable server interdependent loss and delay queueing model with controllable arrival rate under N-policy, Int. J. Science and Research Publication (IJSRP), Vol. 3, Issue 8, pp. 1-13.
[7]. Pankaj Sharma (2014): Transient analysis of loss and delay bulk service markovian queue under n-policy, J. Rajasthan Academy of Physical Sciences, Vol. 13, No. 3.pp. 221-234.
[8]. Pankaj Sharma(2017): Finite population loss and delay queue under no passing restriction and discouragement, Elixir Appl. Math., Vol. 109, pp. 47940-47946.
[9]. Pankaj Sharma(2017): Loss and delay queue with state dependent rates under no passing restriction and discouragement, Int. J. Service Sciences. Vol 6, No. 2, pp. 114-131.
[10]. Pankaj Sharma (2017): transient analysis of interdependent M/M(a,d,b)/1 queue with discouragement and controllable arrival rate, Int. J. of Operation Research, Vol. 29, No. 2, pp. 183-196.
[11]. Shonic, W. A. (1976): A stochastic model for occupancy-related random variables in general acute hospitals, Journal of the American Statistical Association., Vol. 65, pp. 1474-500.
[12]. Washburn, A. (1974): A multi-server queue with nopassing, Oper. Res., Vol. 22, pp. 428-434.

Pankaj Sharma “Loss and Delay Multi Server State Dependent Queue with Discouragement, Additional Server and No-Passing” International Journal of Research and Scientific Innovation (IJRSI) vol.5 issue 8, pp.33-48 August 2018  URL: http://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijrsi/digital-library/volume-5-issue-8/33-48.pdf

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Novel Approach of Workflow Scheduling by Semantic Optimization Approach in Cloud Environment
Varun Jasuja, Divya Saini, Dr. Rajesh Kumar Singh – August 2018 – Page No.: 49-51

Workflow scheduling in scientific computing systems is one of the most challenging problems that focuses on satisfying user-defined quality of service requirements while minimizing the workflow execution cost. So, to reduce the cost we use cloud environment. In cloud environment, resources will increase but it’s utilization is another challenge while using cloud environment. In this thesis, to maintain and utilization of the resources on the cloud computing scheduling mechanism is needed. Many algorithms and protocols are used to manage the parallel jobs and resources which are used to enhance the performance of the CPU on the cloud environment.

Page(s): 49-51                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 16 August 2018

 Varun Jasuja
Assistant Professor in CSE, GNIT Mullana, Haryana, India

 Divya Saini
Department of Computer Science, GNIT Mullana, Haryana, India

 Dr. Rajesh Kumar Singh
Professor, SUS Institute of Computer, Tangori, Punjab, India

[1]. Pandey, Suraj, L. Wu, S. Mayura and R.Buyya, “A particle swarm optimization-based heuristic for scheduling workflow applications in cloud computing environments.” in 24th IEEE International Conference on Advanced Information Networking and Applications (AINA), pp. 400-407, April 20, 2010.
[2]. Chen, Wei-Neng, and Jun Zhang, “An ant colony optimization approach to a grid workflow scheduling problem with various QoS requirements.” in IEEE Transactions Systems, Man, and Cybernetics, Part C: Applications and Reviews, vol. 39, no.1 pp. 29-43, Jan. 2009.
[3]. Byun, Eun-Kyu, Y.S Kee, J.S Kim and S.Maeng, “Cost optimized provisioning of elastic resources for application workflows.” in ELSEVIERFuture Generation Computer Systems, vol. 27, no. 8, pp. 1011-1026, Oct. 2011
[4]. Malawski, Maciej, G.Juve, E. Deelman and J. Nabrzyski, “Cost-and deadline-constrained provisioning for scientific workflow ensembles in Iaas clouds.” in Proceedings of the International Conference on High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis, pp. 22, 2012
[5]. Abrishami, Saeid, Mahmoud Naghibzadeh and Dick HJ Epema,“Deadline-constrained workflow scheduling algorithms for Infrastructure as a Service Clouds.” in ELSEVIERFuture Generation Computer Systems ,vol. 29, no. 1 pp. 158-169, Jan.2013.
[6]. Xu, Meng, Lizhen Cui, H. Wang, and B. Yanbing, “A multiple QoS constrained scheduling strategy of multiple workflows for cloud computing.” inIEEE International SymposiumParallel and Distributed Processing with Applications, pp. 629-634, Aug. 2009.
[7]. Rodriguez Sossa, M., and RajkumarBuyya, “Deadline based Resource Provisioning and Scheduling Algorithm for Scientific Workflows on Clouds.” inIEEETransactionson Cloud Computing, vol. 2, no. 2, pp.222-235, June 2014.
[8]. Netjinda, Nuttapong, B. Sirinaovakul, and T.Achalakul, “Cost optimal scheduling in IaaS for dependent workload with particle swarm optimization.” in The Journal of Supercomputing, pp. 1-25, Feb. 2014.
[9]. Bittencourt, Luiz Fernando, and E. Madeira, “HCOC: A Cost Optimization Algorithm for Workflow Scheduling in Hybrid Clouds” in Journal of Internet Services and Applications , vol.2, no. 3, pp 207-227, Dec. 2011
[10]. Verma, Amandeep, and SakshiKaushal. “Deadline and budget distribution based cost-time optimization workflow scheduling algorithm for cloud.” IJCA Proceedings on international conference on recent advances and future trends in information technology (iRAFIT 2012). Vol. 4. iRAFIT (7), 2012.
[11]. Choudhary, Anubhav, et al. “A GSA based hybrid algorithm for bi-objective workflow scheduling in cloud computing.” Future Generation Computer Systems (2018).
[12]. Vinothina, V., and R. Sridaran. “An Approach for Workflow Scheduling in Cloud Using ACO.” Big Data Analytics. Springer, Singapore, 2018. 525-531.
[13]. Rimal, Bhaskar Prasad, and Martin Maier. “Workflow scheduling in multi-tenant cloud computing environments.” IEEE Transactions on Parallel and Distributed Systems 28.1 (2017): 290-304.
[14]. Abdullahi, Mohammed, and MdAsriNgadi. “Symbiotic Organism Search optimization based task scheduling in cloud computing environment.” Future Generation Computer Systems 56 (2016): 640-650.

Varun Jasuja, Divya Saini, Dr. Rajesh Kumar Singh “Novel Approach of Workflow Scheduling by Semantic Optimization Approach in Cloud Environment” International Journal of Research and Scientific Innovation (IJRSI) vol.5 issue 8, pp.49-51 August 2018 URL: http://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijrsi/digital-library/volume-5-issue-8/49-51.pdf

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Design and Development of M150 Grade Concrete
A. Sreenivasulu – August 2018 – Page No.: 52-55

Concrete is easy to work with, versatile, durable, and economical. By taking a few basic precautions, it is also one of the safest building materials known. The use of high strength concrete results in many advantages such as reduction in beam and column sizes and increase in the building height with many stories. High strength concrete is usually considered to be a concrete with 28 days compressive strength of at least 40 MPa. But in recent years, it is defined as the concrete having a minimum 28 days compressive strength of 60 MPa. In many developed countries, the concrete producers arbitrarily having 28 days compressive strength of above 45 MPa when normal weight of aggregate is used. High strength concrete has been widely used in Civil Engineering in recent years. High strength is made possible by reducing porosity, non homogeneity and micro cracks in concrete and the transition zone. It can be achieved by using super plasticizers and supplementary cementing materials such as silica fume, granulated blast furnace slag and natural pozzolana. High strength concrete has a high modulus of elasticity. High performance concrete with a very low permeability ensures long life of structure exposed to such conditions. The durability is not a problem under extreme conditions of exposure. Preliminary experiments have been done on Cement, Fine aggregate and Coarse aggregate. In the present investigation, Silica fume is used as mineral admixture and 920SH is used as chemical admixture. The w/c ratio for M150 concrete is considered as 0.25. By following the design procedure given by ACI Method, the mix Proportion for M150 grade concrete is derived as 1 : 0.454 : 1.527. The compressive and split tensile strengths are identified for the concrete after exposed to elevated temperature ranging from 50 to 250oC with the exposure duration of 1 to 4 hours.

Page(s): 52-55                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 16 August 2018

 A. Sreenivasulu
Associate Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, PVP Siddhartha Institute of Technology, Vijayawada, Andhra Pradesh, India

[1]. Arshad, A. Khan, William, D. Cook and Denis Mitchel, “Tensile strength of low, medium and high strength concretes at early ages”, ACI Materials Journal, Sept-Oct 1996, pp. 487-493.
[2]. Eugen Brihwiler and Emmanuel Denarie (2008), “Rehabilitation of concrete structures using Ultra-High Performance Fibre Reinforced Concrete”, Department of civil Engineering, Lausanne, Switzerland.
[3]. Faghani Nobari, H., Ejlaly R., “Punching Shear Resistance of High Strength Concrete slabs”, Asian Journal of Civil Engineering (Building and Housing), Vol.4, No.1 (2003), pp. 55-63.
[4]. Flyod slate, O., Arthur Nilson H., and Salvador Martinez, “Mechanical properties of High strength Concrete”, ACI Journal, July-August 1986, pp. 606-613.
[5]. Gupta, S.M., Sehgal, V.K., Kaushik, S.K., “Study on Shrinkage of High Strength Concrete”, ACI Journal proceedings, 1884, Vol. 81, No.4 pp. 364-411.
[6]. Klaus Holschemacher, Sven Klotz (2003); “ Ultra High Strength Concrete under Concentrated Load”, Department of Civil Engineering, HTWK Leipzig.
[7]. Parrot, I.J (1969), “Properties of High Strength Concrete,” Technical Report No. 42.417, Cement and Concrete Association, Wexham Springs.
[8]. S.Nagataki and A.Yonekura (1978), “Studies of the Volume Changes of High Strength Concrete with Superplastizer,” Journal, Japan Prestressed Concrete Engineering Association Tokyo.
[9]. S.M.Gupta, V.K.Sehgal, S.K.Kaushik (1884); “Study on Shrinkage of High Strength Concrete”, ACI Journal proceedings Vol. 81, No.4 pp. 364-411.
[10]. Z. Wadud and S. Ahmad (2001); “ACI method of concrete mix design- A parametric study”, The Eighth East Asia-Pacific Conference on Structural Engineering and Construction, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

A. Sreenivasulu “Design and Development of M150 Grade Concrete ” International Journal of Research and Scientific Innovation (IJRSI) vol.5 issue 8, pp. 52-55 August 2018 URL: http://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijrsi/digital-library/volume-5-issue-8/52-55.pdf

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Test Architecture Optimization for 3-D Stacked ICS with Firm Dies

Anoy Chowdhury – August 2018 Page No.: 56-58

The semiconductor industry is pushing relentlessly for high-performance and low-power chips. Recent advances in semiconductor manufacturing technology have enabled the creation of complete systems with direct stacking and bonding of die-on-die. These system chips are commonly referred to as 3-D stacked ICs (SICs). Through-silicon via (TSV)-based 3-D stacked ICs (SICs) are becoming increasingly important in the semiconductor industry. In this paper, we will try to address test architecture optimization for 3-D stacked ICs implemented using TSVs. We consider the case, namely 3-D SICs with firm die test architectures that are still need to be designed. Here we have to propose the solutions to achieve significant reduction in test length. This will be achieved through proposed test architecture and also to reduce the width of the Test Access Mechanism (TAM) by using serial/parallel conversion technique. Using TSV technology, 3-D ICs are created by placing multiple device layers together through wafer or die stacking, and these are then connected using vertical TSVs.

Page(s): 56-58                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 17 August 2018

 Anoy Chowdhury
Brainware University, Kolkata, West Bengal, India

[1]. V. Iyengar, K. Chakrabarty, and E. J. Marinissen, Test wrapper and test access mechanism co optimization for system-on-chip J. Electron.Testing Theory Application., vol. 18, pp. 213 230, Apr. 2002.
[2]. E. J. Marinissen, S. K. Goel, and M. Lousberg, Wrapper design for embedded core test in Proc. Int. Test Conf., 2000, pp. 911920.
[3]. S. K. Goel and E. J. Marinissen, SoC test architecture design for efficient utilization of test bandwidth ACM Trans. Des. Autom. Electron. Syst., vol. 8, no. 4, pp. 399429, 2003.
[4]. E. Larsson, K. Arvidsson, H. Fujiwara, and Z. Peng, Efficient test solutions for core-based designs IEEE Trans. Comput.-Aided Des., vol. 23, no. 5, pp. 758775, May 2004.
[5]. Y. Huang, S. M. Reddy, W.-T. Cheng, P. Reuter, N. Mukherjee, C.-C. Tsai, O. Samman, and Y.Zaidan, Optimal core wrapper width selection and SOCs test scheduling based on 3-D bin packing algorithm in Proc. Int. Test Conf. Comput., 2002, pp. 7482.
[6]. Q. Xu and N. Nicolici, Resource-constrained system-on-a-chip test: A survey IEE Proc.: Comput. Digital Tech., vol. 152, no. 1, pp. 6781, Jan. 2005.
[7]. Brandon Noia, Krishnendu Chakrabarty, Sandeep Kumar Goel, Erik Jan Marinissen, Jouke Verbree Test-Architecture Optimization and Test Scheduling for TSV-Based 3-D Stacked ICs IEEE Transaction on computer-aided-design of integrated circuits and systems, vol. 30, no. 11, November 2011.
[8]. B. Noia, K. Chakrabarty, and Y. Xie, Test-wrapper optimization for embedded cores in TSV-based 3-D SoCs in Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. Comput. Des, Oct. 2009, pp. 7077.
[9]. X. Wu, Y. Chen, K. Chakrabarty, and Y. Xie, Test-access mechanism optimization for core-based 3-D SoCs Microelectron. J., vol. 41, no. 10, pp. 601615, Oct. 2010.
[10]. L. Jiang, L. Huang, and Q. Xu, Test architecture design and optimization for 3-D SoCs in Proc. Des. Autom. Test Eur., 2009, pp. 220225.
[11]. L. Jiang, Q. Xu, K. Chakrabarty, and T. M. Mak, Layout-driven test architecture design and optimization for 3-D SoCs under pre-bond test pin-count constraint in Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. Comput.-Aided Des, Nov. 2009, pp.191196.
[12]. E. J. Marinissen, J. Verbree, and M. Konijnenburg, A structured and scalable test access architecture for TSV-based 3-D stacked ICs in Proc. IEEE VLSI Test Symp., Apr. 2010, pp 269274..
[13]. Book Essentials of Electronic Testing for Digital, Memory and Mixed- Signal VLSI Circuits By Michael L. Bushnell, Vishwani D. Agrawal.

Anoy Chowdhury “Test Architecture Optimization for 3-D Stacked ICS with Firm Dies” International Journal of Research and Scientific Innovation (IJRSI) vol.5 issue 8, pp.56-58 August 2018  URL: http://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijrsi/digital-library/volume-5-issue-8/56-58.pdf

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The Impact of Poverty on Academic Achievement: A Study on the Students of Begum Rokeya University, Rangpur
Md. Anamul Haque, Dr. Md. Roshidul Islam – August 2018 – Page No.: 59-63

This study investigates the perceptions of students of the effects of poverty on academic achievement in Begum Rokeya University, Rangpur. It attempted to investigate what happens to a student’s performance at University when he/she comes from a poor family background. Data was collected from the students of Begum Rokeya University, Rangpur area that the researcher had selected. In this study qualitative and quantitative methods were used. Data was collected through questionnaires. The chi square method and the logistic regression are used to find the results of the study. The research findings proved that poverty has negative effects on poor students’ academic achievement. Tuition, scholarship and parent’s education level also affect the students’ academic achievement.

Page(s): 59-63                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 19 August 2018

 Md. Anamul Haque
Research Student, Department of Statistics, Begum Rokeya University, Rangpur, Bangladesh

 Dr. Md. Roshidul Islam
Assistant Professor, Department of Statistics, Begum Rokeya University, Rangpur, Bangladesh

[1]. http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/speech/2016/10/17/learning-bangladesh-journey-toward-ending-poverty
[2]. “Bangladesh Continues to Reduce Poverty But at Slower Pace”. World Bank. The World Bank. Retrieved 11 April 2018.
[3]. Bursac, Z., Gauss, C.H., Williams, D.K. and Hosmer, D.W., 2008. Purposeful selection of variables in logistic regression. Source code for biology and medicine, 3(1), p.17.
[4]. Engle, P.L. and Black, M.M., 2008. The effect of poverty on child development and educational outcomes. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1136(1), pp.243-256.
[5]. Hill, N.E. and Taylor, L.C., 2004. Parental school involvement and children’s academic achievement: Pragmatics and issues. Current directions in psychological science, 13(4), pp.161-164.
[6]. Jeynes, W.H., 2007. The relationship between parental involvement and urban secondary school student academic achievement: A meta-analysis. Urban education, 42(1), pp.82-110.
[7]. Lacour, M. and Tissington, L.D., 2011. The effects of poverty on academic achievement. Educational Research and Reviews, 6(7), pp.522-527.
[8]. Rahamneh, K.F.A., 2012. Reasons For The Low Academic Achievement Among The Students Of The Main Stages In Selected Schools In The Province of Al-Balqa. Ozean Journal of Social Sciences, 5(1), pp.31-40.
[9]. Siqueira, C.M. and Gurgel-Giannetti, J., 2011. Poor school performance: an updated review. Revista da Associação Médica Brasileira, 57(1), pp.78-87.[10]. Burney, V.H. and Beilke, J.R., 2008. The constraints of poverty on high achievement. Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 31(3), pp.295-321.
[10]. Moyo, W., 2013. Causes and Effects of Poverty on Academic Achievements of Rural Secondary School Students: Case of Tshazi Secondary School in Insiza District. International Journal of Asian Social Science, 3(10), pp.2104-2113.
[11]. Chinyoka, K. and Naidu, N., 2013. Uncaging the caged: Exploring the impact of poverty on the academic performance of form three learners in Zimbabwe. International Journal of Educational Sciences, 5(3), pp.271-281.
[12]. Capra, T., 2009. Poverty and its impact on education: Today and tomorrow. Thought & Action, p.75.
[13]. Robinson, S., Wiley, S.L., Myhre, L.G., Bondurant, S. and Mamlin, J.J., 1976. Temperature regulation of men following heatstroke. Israel journal of medical sciences, 12(8), pp.786-795.
[14]. Nichols, S.L., Glass, G.V. and Berliner, D.C., 2006. High-stakes testing and student achievement: Does accountability pressure increase student learning?.education policy analysis archives, 14, p.1.
[15]. Deserno, M., Holm, C. and May, S., 2000. Fraction of condensed counterions around a charged rod: Comparison of Poisson− Boltzmann theory and computer simulations. Macromolecules, 33(1), pp.199-206.
[16]. Denzin, J.T. and Shek, D.T., 2011. Quantitative and qualitative approaches in the study of poverty and adolescent development: separation or integration?. International journal of adolescent medicine and health, 23(2), pp.115-121.
[17]. Beyer, S., 1995. Maternal Employment and Children′ s Academic Achievement: Parenting Styles as Mediating Variable. Developmental Review, 15(2), pp.212-253.

Md. Anamul Haque, Dr. Md. Roshidul Islam “The Impact of Poverty on Academic Achievement: A Study on the Students of Begum Rokeya University, Rangpur” International Journal of Research and Scientific Innovation (IJRSI) vol.5 issue 8, pp.59-63 August 2018 URL: http://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijrsi/digital-library/volume-5-issue-8/59-63.pdf

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A Review Study of Transmission Line Tower Structure by FEM

Shubham Kashyap, Prof. Sumit Pahwa – August 2018 Page No.: 64-69

Transmission line structures are frequently made out of metal lattice structures, due to their ease of assembly and because of their mild weight, which ends up in enormously small foundations. Transmission line towers, though designed in step with code provisions, might also fail in the course of mandatory trying out required in many nations. The present Study interacts with the investigation of static and dynamic analysis of Electric tower structure. Various literature researches study to analyze research work performed on electric tower structure by using FEM analysis.

Page(s): 64-69                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 19 August 2018

 Shubham Kashyap
Research Scholar, Department of Civil Engineering, Alpine Institute of Technology, Ujjain, M.P, India.

 Prof. Sumit Pahwa
Assistant Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, Alpine Institute of Technology, Ujjain, M.P, India..

[1]. Falguni Patel, Unnati Bhagat, Dimple Desai, “A Review on Buckling Analysis of Lattice Transmission Tower”, International Journal of Advance Engineering and Research Development, Volume 4, Issue 11, 2017, pp.494-498.
[2]. Parashuram Hadimani, Sachin Kulkarni, “Static and Dynamic Analysis of Trasmission Line Tower”, International Journal of Emerging Research in Management &Technology, Volume-6, Issue-2, 2017.
[3]. J. Vinotha Jenifer, Priya A. Jacob, “A comparative study on analysis of Telecommunication tower with different member cross section”, International Journal of Civil Engineering and Technology (IJCIET), Volume 8, Issue 4, April 2017, pp. 1002-1011.
[4]. Harshil Patel, Satyen Ramani, “Finite Element Analysis of Monopole Tower for Domestic Wind Turbine”, Journal of Emerging Technologies and Innovative Research (JETIR), Volume 4, Issue 04, 2017.
[5]. Emil Veg, Mladen Regodić, Aleksandra Joksimovi, “Development of the Transmission Tower Virtual 3D Model for Structural Analysis in ANSYS”, FME Transactions, VOL. 45, No 2, 2017.
[6]. Zarina Itam, Salmia Beddu, Mohd Kamal, “Finite Element Analysis of the Maximum Stress at the Joints of the Transmission Tower”, International Conference on Advances in Renewable Energy and Technologies, 32, 2016.
[7]. Shivam Panwar, Yogesh Kaushik, Anubhav Singh, “Structural Analysis and Design of Steel Transmission Tower in Wind Zones II and IV- A Comparative Study”, International Journal of Engineering Technology, Management and Applied Sciences, Volume 4, Issue 5, 2016.
[8]. Pasupuleti. Murahari krishna, G.Ganesh Naidu,”dynamic analysis of electrical transmission tower using Finite element Technique”, International Journal of Engineering Research, Vol.4., Issue.5., 2016.
[9]. Raju Varakavi, E.Arunakanthi, “Dynamic Analysis of Electrical Transmission Line Towers”, International Journal of Engineering Science and Computing, Volume 6 Issue No. 7, 2016.
[10]. Lin Wang, Athanasios Kolios, Martinez Luengo, “Structural optimisation of wind turbine towers 1 based on finite element analysis and genetic algorithm”, Wind Energy Science Discussions, 2016, doi:10.5194/wes-2016-41.
[11]. Renju Chandran, Linda Ann Mathew, “Model and Seismic Analysis of Transmission Tower with I, C and Circular Sections Using Finite Element Analysis”, International Journal of Science and Research (IJSR), Volume 5 Issue 7, July 2016.
[12]. Chandran R, Mathew, “Model and Seismic Analysis of Transmission Tower with I, C and Circular Sections Using Finite Element Analysis”, International Journal of Science and Research (IJSR), Volume 5 Issue 7, July 2016, pp no-1297-1300.
[13]. Boshra Eltaly, Amen Saka,Kamel Kandil, “FE Simulation of Transmission Tower”, Hindawi Publishing Corporation Advances in Civil Engineering, 2014, doi:dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/258148.
[14]. Huang, Li-Jeng, Lin, Yi-Jun, “Free Vibration and Seismic Responses of Power Transmission Tower Using ANSYS and SAP2000”, International Journal of Emerging Technology and Advanced Engineering, Volume 4, Issue 8, August 2014.
[15]. Magalhaes Junior, Rios, T. S. Ferreira, “Structural analysis and structural optimization of self-supporting truss towers to support a large Wind turbine”, international journal of optimization in civil engineering, Vol.4, 2014.

Shubham Kashyap, Prof. Sumit Pahwa “A Review Study of Transmission Line Tower Structure by FEM” International Journal of Research and Scientific Innovation (IJRSI) vol.5 issue 8, pp.64-69 August 2018  URL: http://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijrsi/digital-library/volume-5-issue-8/64-69.pdf

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Performance Analysis of Thermal Characteristics of Transient Heat Transfer through Finite Fins and Various Shapes of Notches : A Review
Aartee S.Lokhande, Sachin Nimbulkar – August 2018 – Page No.: 70-73

The present article investigates the analysis of transient heat conduction through fins. Fins are the extended surface used for enhancing the dissipation of heat transfer rate and different geometrical fins are used as per requirement its accessibility depends. Fins are extensively used in heat exchanging device in automobiles radiators, industrial sectors, power plants, newer technology like fuel cells. Earlier Work under steady state conduction had been carried out extensively. Transient heat conduction analysis for fins is being considered for simplifying heat transfer queries. Transient closed form solution had been derived earlier by various researchers. As proper heat dissipation results in saving of power and lesser chances of overheating problems, perforation are made on the fins. Perforated fin improves heat transfer rate collate to solid fin by varying the different parameter like shape of perforation, diameter of perforation and number of perforation. For the purpose of contrast and optimization, notches of different aspect ratio on single plate have also been analyzed. In a lengthwise short array where the single chimney flow pattern is present, the central portion of fin flat becomes futile due to the fact that, the heated air comes in its contact. In the present study, the fins of different geometries are modified by deposing the central fin portion by cutting a triangular, rectangular and un-notch fins. This article presents a performance analysis of thermal characteristics of Transient Heat Transfer for finite fins and various shapes of notches on single plate for that an experimental setup is developing and also shows a comparison between the experimental results and results obtained by using ANSYS software.

Page(s): 70-73                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 19 August 2018

 Aartee S.Lokhande
ME Thermal, Mechanical Department, G.H.R.I.E.M, Jalgoan, Maharashtra, India

 Sachin Nimbulkar
Assistant Professor, Mechanical Department, G.H.R.I.E.M, Jalgoan, Maharashtra, India

[1] Arun Kumar Sao, Dr. Yamuna Banjare, “ Analysis of Thermal Characteristics of Transient Heat Conduction through Long Fin and Comparison with Exact Fin Theory and Quasi steady. “ Certified Journal, volume 4,Issue11, November 2014.
[2] Raseelo j Charis Harley , “ Transient heat transfer in longitudinal fins of various profiles with temperature –dependent thermal conductivity and heat transfer coefficient” volume 77 september 2011.
[3] Dr.Rahul Salhotra and Harbans Singh Ber,” Exact Solution for Transient Heat Conduction through Long Fin” International Journal of Mechanics and Thermodynamics. Issn2278-361X Volume 4, Number 1(2013).
[4] Majtaba Mokhtari, M. Barzegar Gerdroobary, Rezvan Yeganesh, K Fallah, “Numerical study of mixed convection heat transfer of various fin arrangement in horizontal channel” Engineering science and technology, an International Journal. 24 december 2016.
[5] Esmail M.A.Mokhimer, Heat transfer from extended surface subject to variable heat transfer coefficient. Heat and mass transfer january 2003.
[6] M.Shaukat ali, M. Altamush Siddiqui, “Effect of variable heat transfer coefficient on the performance of the different profile fins” International conference on Thermal engineering. 24 January 2004.
[7] A.Moradi, H. Ahmadikia, “Analytical Solution For Different Profiles of Fin With Temperature -Dependent Thermal Conductivity” Mathematical problems in engineering Volume 2010, Article ID 568263.
[8] Raseelo J. Moitsheki and Atish Rowjee,” Steady Heat Transfer Through a Two- Dimensional Rectangular Straight Fin”. Mathamatical problems in engineering Volume 2011, Article ID 826819.
[9] Sanjeev D. Suryawanshi, Narayan K. Sane, “Natural Convection Heat Transfer From Horizontal Rectangular Inverted Notched Fin Arrays”. Trans of the ASME , Vol. 131 ,August 2009
[10] Effect of Heat Transfer in a Cylindrical Fin Body By Varying Its Geometry and Material ISSN 2349-2163 Volume 1 Issue 8 September 2014.
[11] S. M. Ramnani, S.Y. Bhosale “Optimization of Heat Transfer Rate by Forced Convection Process on Perforated Fin”. ISSN 4678-4156 Volume 1 Issue 3 November 2013.
[12] B.N.Niroop kumar gowd, Ramatulasi [12] they calculate heat transfer rate of cylinder fin body by varying geometry and material. Volume 3,No.4, October 2014.
[13] Kavita H. Dhanawade1, Vivek K. Sunnapwar and Hanamant S. Dhanawade, “Thermal Analysis of Square and Circular Perforated Fin Arrays by Forced Convection”, volume1 Issue 2 October 14.
[14] S M.Wange, R.M.Metkar,“ Computational Analysis of Inverted Notched Fin Array Dissipating Heat by Natural Convection ”, International Journal of Engineering and Innovative Technology (IJEIT) Volume 2, Issue 11, May 2013.
[15] Shivdas S. Kharche, Hemant S. Farkade,” Heat Transfer Analysis through Fin Array by Using Natural Convection”, International Journal of Emerging Technology and Advanced Engineering, ISSN 2250-2459, Vol 2, Issue 4, April 2012.

Aartee S.Lokhande, Sachin Nimbulkar “Performance Analysis of Thermal Characteristics of Transient Heat Transfer through Finite Fins and Various Shapes of Notches : A Review” International Journal of Research and Scientific Innovation (IJRSI) vol.5 issue 8, pp. 70-73 August 2018 URL: http://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijrsi/digital-library/volume-5-issue-8/70-73.pdf

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Optimal Capacitor Placement in Radial Distribution Systems Using Flower Pollination Algorithm

K. Prabha Rani, U. P. Kumar Chaturvedula – August 2018 Page No.: 74-79

Optimal capacitor placement is carried out in distribution systems for active power loss reduction and improving voltage profile. In this paper, Flower Pollination Algorithm (FPA) is be implemented for optimal allocations and sizing of capacitors in various distribution systems. First the candidate buses for installing capacitors will be suggested using Power Loss Index (PLI). Then the FPA is employed to deduce the size of capacitors and their locations from the selected buses. The objective function is designed to reduce the total cost and consequently to increase the net saving per year. The proposed algorithm will be tested on 15, 69 and 85 bus radial distribution systems. The voltage profile and reduction in active power loss are observed on the three test systems.

Page(s): 74-79                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 21 August 2018

 K. Prabha Rani
Aditya College of Engineering, Surampalem, Andhra Pradesh, India

 U. P. Kumar Chaturvedula
Aditya College of Engineering, Surampalem, Andhra Pradesh, India

[1]. A.Y. Abdelaziz a, E.S. Ali b,*, S.M. Abd Elazim “Optimal sizing and locations of capacitors in radial distribution systems via flower pollination optimization algorithm and power loss index”, Engineering Science and Technology, Vol. 19, 2016, Pp. 610-618.
[2]. X.S. Yang, “Flower pollination algorithm for global optimization, in Unconventional Computation and Natural Computation”, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 7445, 2012, pp. 240–249.
[3]. S.Joya Isac, K.Suresh Kumar, P. Vijaya Kumar, “Optimal Capacitor Placement in Radial Distribution System to minimize the loss using Fuzzy Logic Control”, IEEE International Conference on Smart Structures and Systems (ICSSS), 2013 28-29th March 2013, Chennai, India.
[4]. Avadhanam Kartikeya Sarma, “Optimal Capacitor Placement in Radial Distribution Systems using Artificial Bee Colony (ABC) Algorithm” Innovative Systems Design and Engineering, Vol 2, No 4, 2011
[5]. K. Muthukumar, S. Jayalalitha, M. Ramasamy, C. Haricharan, “Optimal shunt capacitor allocation and sizing using harmony search algorithm for power loss minimization in radial distribution networks”, International Journal of Developmental Research Vol. 4, Issue. 3, 2014, Pp. 537–545.
[6]. A. Y. Abdelazizl, M. A. EI-Sharkawyl, M. A. Attial and Y. G. Hegazy “A Genetic Algorithm for Optimal Allocation of FACTS to enhance power system performance with wind penetration”, Swarm, Evolutionary, and Memetic Computing Vol. 7677, pp 548-557
[7]. Almoataz Y. Abdelaziza & Ehab S. Alibca “Static VAR Compensator Damping Controller Design Based on Flower Pollination Algorithm for a Multimachine Power System”, Energy 101:506-518 • April 2016
[8]. P.V. Prasad, S. Sivanagaraju, N. Sreenivasulu, A fuzzy genetic algorithm for optimal capacitor placement in radial distribution systems, ARPN J. Eng. Appl. Sci. Vol. 2, Issue.3, 2007, Pp. 28–32.
[9]. H.D. Chiang, J.C. Wang, O. Cockings, H.D. Shin, “Optimal capacitor placements in distribution systems: part 1: A new formulation and the overall problem”, IEEE Transactions in Power Delivery, Vol. 5, Issue. 2, 1990, Pp. 634–642.
[10]. D. Das, H.S. Nagi, D.P. Kothari, “Novel method for solving radial distribution networks”, IEE Proc. Generation Transm. Distribution, Vol. 141, Issue. 4, 1994, 291–298.
[11]. Ahmed R, Abul Wafa, “A Network Topology based Load Flow for Radial Distribution Networks with Composite and Exponential Load, Electric Power Systems Research”, Vol. 91, 2012, Pp. 37-43
[12]. Jen-Hao Teng, “A Network- Topology based Three-Phase Load flow for Distribution systems”, Vol.24, No.4, 2000, Pp. 259-264.
[13]. D. Das, D.P. Kothari, A Kalam “Simple and effcient method for load flow Solution of radial distribution networks”., Electrical Power and Energy Systems, Butterworth, Heinmann Publications, Vol 17, No.5, pp335 – 346,1995.
[14]. Shirmohammadi D., H.W. Hong, A. Semlyen, and G.X. Luo 1988, “ A compensation based power flow method for weakly meshed distribution and transmission netowkrs. IEEE Trnaas. On Power Systems, Vol 3, pp 753-762.
[15]. W. H. Kersting and D. L. Mendive, “An application of ladder network theory to the solution of three phase radial load flow problem”, Proceedings of IEEE PES Winter meeting, New York, January 1976, pp. A76 0448.
[16]. S. K. Goswami, S. K. Basu: ’Direct solution of distribution systems’, IEE Transactions on Generation, Transmission & Distribution, Vol. 138, No. 1, 1991, pp. 78-88.
[17]. S. Ghosh and D. Das: ’Method for load flow solution of radial distribution networks’, IEE Proceedings Generation, Transmission and Distribution, Vol. 146, No.6, November 1999, pp. 641-648.
[18]. S. K. Goswami, S. K. Basu, “An approach for load flow solution of meshed distribution networks’, IE Journal-EL, pp. 66-70.
[19]. Gowthami Kunche, K. V. S. Ramachandra Murthy , “Load Flow Solution for Radial Networks with Composite and Exponential Loads” International Journal of Advanced Research in Electrical, Electronics and Instrumentation Engineering Vol. 6, Issue 12, December 2017 pp 8899-8908.

K. Prabha Rani, U. P. Kumar Chaturvedula “Optimal Capacitor Placement in Radial Distribution Systems Using Flower Pollination Algorithm” International Journal of Research and Scientific Innovation (IJRSI) vol.5 issue 8, pp.74-79 August 2018  URL: http://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijrsi/digital-library/volume-5-issue-8/74-79.pdf

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Static and Dynamic Analysis of Electric Tower Structure by FEM
Shubham Kashyap, Prof. Sumit Pahwa – August 2018 – Page No.: 80-85

The present Study interacts with the investigation of static and dynamic analysis of Electric tower structure. The analysis and modeling of tower is executed the use of FE based ANSYS software program. The model is created in Solidwork and then imported to ANSYS workbench. The loads acting at the tower considered are dead load, live load and dynamic masses (Seismic and wind). The current tower has height of 40m and X type bracing used in designing of tower structure. Static and dynamic analysis is executed in element using FE based ANSYS software program. Static, modal, reaction spectrum and wind analysis is executed. Wind region taken into consideration is region III. The wind strain relies upon at the gust reaction factor, which increases with height. The conduct of current tower is analyzed for one-of-a-kind analysis. The most deformation, combined stresses, natural frequencies and direct pressure are acquired and plotted graphically.

Page(s): 80-85                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 27 August 2018

 Shubham Kashyap
Research Scholar, Department of Civil Engineering. Alpine Institute of Technology, Ujjain, M.P, India.

 Prof. Sumit Pahwa
Assistant Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, Alpine Institute of Technology, Ujjain, M.P, India.

[1]. Falguni Patel, Unnati Bhagat, Dimple Desai, “A Review on Buckling Analysis of Lattice Transmission Tower”, International Journal of Advance Engineering and Research Development, Volume 4, Issue 11, 2017, pp.494-498.
[2]. ParashuramHadimani, Sachin Kulkarni, “Static and Dynamic Analysis of Trasmission Line Tower”, International Journal of Emerging Research in Management &Technology, Volume-6, Issue-2, 2017.
[3]. J. Vinotha Jenifer, Priya A. Jacob, “A comparative study on analysis of Telecommunication tower with different member cross section”, International Journal of Civil Engineering and Technology (IJCIET), Volume 8, Issue 4, April 2017, pp. 1002-1011.
[4]. Harshil Patel, SatyenRamani, “Finite Element Analysis of Monopole Tower for Domestic Wind Turbine”, Journal of Emerging Technologies and Innovative Research (JETIR), Volume 4, Issue 04, 2017.
[5]. Emil Veg, MladenRegodić, Aleksandra Joksimovi, “Development of the Transmission Tower Virtual 3D Model for Structural Analysis in ANSYS”, FME Transactions, VOL. 45, No 2, 2017.
[6]. ZarinaItam, SalmiaBeddu, Mohd Kamal, “Finite Element Analysis of the Maximum Stress at the Joints of the Transmission Tower”, International Conference on Advances in Renewable Energy and Technologies, 32, 2016.
[7]. ShivamPanwar, Yogesh Kaushik, Anubhav Singh, “Structural Analysis and Design of Steel Transmission Tower in Wind Zones II and IV- A Comparative Study”, International Journal of Engineering Technology, Management and Applied Sciences, Volume 4, Issue 5, 2016.
[8]. Pasupuleti. Muraharikrishna, G.GaneshNaidu,”dynamic analysis of electrical transmission tower usingFinite element Technique”, International Journal of Engineering Research, Vol.4., Issue.5., 2016.
[9]. Raju Varakavi, E.Arunakanthi, “Dynamic Analysis of Electrical Transmission Line Towers”, International Journal of Engineering Science and Computing, Volume 6 Issue No. 7, 2016.
[10]. Lin Wang, Athanasios Kolios, Martinez Luengo, “Structural optimisation of wind turbine towers 1 based on finite element analysis and genetic algorithm”, Wind Energy Science Discussions, 2016, doi:10.5194/wes-2016-41.
[11]. BoshraEltaly, Amen Saka,KamelKandil, “FE Simulation of Transmission Tower”, Hindawi Publishing Corporation Advances in Civil Engineering, 2014, doi:dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/258148.
[12]. Huang, Li-Jeng, Lin, Yi-Jun, “Free Vibration and Seismic Responses of Power Transmission Tower Using ANSYS and SAP2000”, International Journal of Emerging Technology and Advanced Engineering, Volume 4, Issue 8, August 2014.
[13]. Magalhaes Junior, Rios, T. S. Ferreira, “Structural analysis and structural optimization of self-supporting truss towers to support a large Wind turbine”, international journal of optimization in civil engineering, Vol.4, 2014.

Shubham Kashyap, Prof. Sumit Pahwa “Static and Dynamic Analysis of Electric Tower Structure by FEM” International Journal of Research and Scientific Innovation (IJRSI) vol.5 issue 8, pp.80-85 August 2018 URL: http://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijrsi/digital-library/volume-5-issue-8/80-85.pdf

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Case Study of Communication Systems of Raja Bhoj Airport, Bhopal

Ishita Verma – August 2018 Page No.: 86-89

This paper presents an overview of various aeronautical communication systems and linkage between Primary and Secondary systems. It also describes the purposes, characteristics, and operational facts of both existing and requirements of future aeronautical systems.

 Ishita Verma
BE-VII Semester, Electronics and Telecommunications Department, LNCT, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India

[1]. Bhopal Airport, Retrieved from https://www.bhopalairport.com
[2]. Airport Authority of India https://www.aai.aero/en/airports/bhopal
[3]. Knowledge amassed during interaction and training imparted by AAI officials in CNS.

Ishita Verma “Case Study of Communication Systems of Raja Bhoj Airport, Bhopal” International Journal of Research and Scientific Innovation (IJRSI) vol.5 issue 8, pp.86-89 August 2018  URL: http://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijrsi/digital-library/volume-5-issue-8/86-89.pdf

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“An Update Review on Recent Advancements in Multiple Emulsion”
Sarika S. Lokhande, Namita N. Phalke, Vijay N. Raje, Savita S. More – August 2018 – Page No.: 90-96

Emulsions are scatter systems of two immiscible or inadequately miscible liquid phases. Emulsion can be classified as simple oil-in-water (O/W) or water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions and multiple water-in oil-in-water (W/O/W) or oil-in-water-in-oil (O/W/O) emulsions. W/O/W emulsions had been used as drug delivery system (DDS).Preparation of mono dispersed multiple emulsion is important in DDS to improve their stability and to make possible control of their properties. This review described five methods to prepare multiple emulsions viz. two-step emulsification method, modified two-step emulsification method, phase inversion method & membrane emulsification. With the progression in techniques for preparation, stabilization and rheological characterization of multiple emulsions, it will be able to provide a new carrier system for drugs, cosmetics and pharmaceutical agents.

Page(s): 90-96                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 27 August 2018

 Sarika S. Lokhande
GES College of Pharmacy, Limb, Satara, Maharashtra, India

 Namita N. Phalke
GES College of Pharmacy, Limb, Satara, Maharashtra, India

 Vijay N. Raje
GES College of Pharmacy, Limb, Satara, Maharashtra, India

 Savita S. More
GES College of Pharmacy, Limb, Satara, Maharashtra, India

[1]. Vyas S.P., Khar, R.K, “Targeted & Controlled Drug Delivery- Novel Carrier Systems”, CBS Publishers & Distributors, 1st Edtn. , 2002, 303-30.
[2]. Davis SS, Hadgraft J, Palin KJ, in P. Becher (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Emulsion Technology,Marcel Dekker, New York, Vol. 2, 2005, 159.
[3]. Florence AT, Whitehill D, Int. J. Pharm., 1982, 11, 277.
[4]. Florence AT, Whitehill, JD, Colloid Interface Sci., 1981, 79, 243.
[5]. Sinha VR, Kumar A, “Multiple Emulsions: An overview of Formulation, Characterization, Stability & Applications”, Indian J. of Pharm. Sci., 2002, 64(3), 191-199.
[6]. Bhatia N., Pandit S., Agrawal S. and Gupta D. A review on multiple emulsions. International Journal of Pharmaceutical Erudition. 2013; 3(2): 22-30.
[7]. www.slideshare.net
[8]. Prajapati S.B., Bhatt H., Koli A., Dharamsi A. and Shah S.A. An overview of preparation, evaluation and applications of multiple emulsions. International Journal for Pharmaceutical Research Scholars. 2013; 2(1): 142-150.
[9]. Vyas S.P. and Khar R.K. Multiple emulsions: Novel carrier systems. CBS Publishers and Distributors. First Edition, 2004; 303-328.
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[11]. Rajeshkumar, Murugesan Senthil kumar, Nanjaian Mahadevan. Multiple emulsion: A Review. International Journal of Recent Advances in Pharmaceutical Research, 2012; 2(1): 9-19
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[13]. Marcel Dekker, New York, Vol. 2, 2005, 159.
[14]. Florence AT, Whitehill D, Int. J. Pharm., 1982, 11, 277.
[15]. Florence AT, Whitehill, JD, Colloid Interface Sci., 1981, 79, 243.
[16]. Rajesh Kumar, Murugesan SK, Nanjaian M, “Multiple Emulsion: A Review”, Int. J. of Recent Advanced in Pharm. Research, 2012, 2(1), 9-19.
[17]. Davis SS, Walker IM, “Measurement of the yield of multiple emulsion droplets by a fluorescent tracer technique’. Int J Pharm. 1983, 17, 203-213
[18]. Khan AY, “Potentials of Liquid Membrane System: An overview”,Pharmainfo.net.2007,5(6).
[19]. M. Akhtar, Q. He, T. Lambourne and L. Lin. A Novel Approach for Making Multiple Emulsions: The Use of Spinning Disc Reactor.
[20]. Shahid Iqbal, Musa Kaleem Baloch, Gulzar Hameed, David Julian McClements. Controlling W/O/W multiple emulsion microstructure by osmotic swelling and internal protein gelation. Food Research International, 2013; 1613–1620
[21]. Kumar Rajesh, Kumar Murugesan,Mahadevan Nanjaian, “Multiple Emulsions: A Review”, Int. J. Recent Adv. Pharm. Research, January 2012; 2(1): 9-19.
[22]. Jain, N.K., “Advances in Controlled and Novel Drug Delivery”, CBS Publishers & Distributors, 1st Edtn. , 2001, 381-407.
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[24]. Talegaonkar S, Vyas SP, “Inverse targeting of diclofenac sodium to reticuloendothelial systemrich organs by sphere-in-oil-in-water (s/o/w) multiple emulsions containing poloxamer”, J Drug Target. 2005, 13(3), 173–178.
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Sarika S. Lokhande, Namita N. Phalke, Vijay N. Raje, Savita S. More ““An Update Review on Recent Advancements in Multiple Emulsion”” International Journal of Research and Scientific Innovation (IJRSI) vol.5 issue 8, pp.90-96 August 2018 URL: http://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijrsi/digital-library/volume-5-issue-8/90-96.pdf

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“Effect of Temperature Stresses in Composite Girder Bridges”
Vishnu Sharma, Dr A. K. Dwivedi – August 2018 – Page No.: 97-101

Thermal actions differ from other load types considered during bridge design through being a constraining load. A temperature profile can be divided into a uniform part that affect the bridge with a linear expansion and a non-uniform part that will induce an arch shape of the bridge deck.
The response of composite bridge structures to environmental temperature effects is a complex transient phenomenon as bridges are subjected to daily repeated cycles of solar heating and cooling and ambient temperatures varying with time.
Composite bridges exposed to environment continuously undergo varying temperatures due to diurnal and seasonal changes in climatic or atmospheric conditions. Temperature distributions in a bridge structure depend upon several environments, meteorological and a bridge parameter. The major environmental parameters influencing the temperature distributions in a bridge structure include intensity of solar radiation, daily range of ambient air temperature humidity, cloud covers, wind speed, turbidity of atmosphere etc.
In addition to these parameters the temperature variation in bridges is also affected by some other parameters as well which includes geographic location of the bridge as governed by the latitude and altitude, geometrical parameters and materials properties of the bridge cross sections.
Diurnal and seasonal changes in the local climatic conditions cause the rise and fall in the overall temperature of a bridge structure, referred to as effective bridge temperature, and development of temperature differentials across the depth of cross section referred to as thermal gradient or differential temperature. The range of the daily maximum and minimum ambient air temperature usually affects the effective temperature of the bridge while the solar radiation contributes to the thermal gradients in the bridge cross sections.
The objective of the study were to construct and instrument composite bridge, b) to subject the structure to thermal loading, and c ) to correlate the experimental temperature distributions. It was concluded that theoretical procedure provides a rational method for predicting the thermal behavior of composite-girder bridge structures and can be applied with reasonable confidence when used with realistic temperature, profiles, material properties, and substructure stiffness characteristics.

Page(s): 97-101                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 28 August 2018

 Vishnu Sharma
Research Scholar in Rajasthan Technical University Kota, Rajasthan, India

 Dr A. K. Dwivedi
Professor in Civil Engineering Department, Rajasthan Technical University, Kota, Rajasthan, India

[1]. Dwivedi , A.K. Bhargava , P. Bhandari, N.M.(2004), “ Thermal Gradients in Concrete Box Girder Bridges”, The Bridge and Structural Engineer, IABSE, New Delhi Vol 34, No 1, pp 53-72
[2]. AASHTO(1989) , “ Guide specifications for Thermal effects in Concrete Bridge Superstructure”, Washington, D.C.
[3]. Bhandari , N.M. and Bhargava , P(2002), “ Thermal Studies in Concrete Bridges” Volume on Bridge Engineering. Some Issues of Research Interest, Department of Civil Engineering , Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee, India pp 109-130.
[4]. Branco, Fernando A and Mendes, Pedro A(1993), “ Thermal Actions for Concrete Bridge Design”, Journal of Structural Division, ASCE, Vol 119, No 8,pp. 2313-2331
[5]. British Standard Institution, BS 5400-1978: Part 2: Steel, Concrete and Composite Bridges, “ Specification for Loads”, London.
[6]. Clark, L.A.(1983), “ Concrete Bridge Design to BS 5400”, Construction Press, London, pp 36-38 and 158-170.
[7]. Elbadry, M.M. and Ghali A (1983), “ Temperature Variations in Concrete Bridges”, Journal of Structural Division, ASCE Vol 109, No STIO, pp 2355-2374.
[8]. Imbsen, R.A, Vendershaf, D.E, Schamber, R.A and Nutt, R.V(1985), “ Thermal Effects in Concrete Bridge Superstructure”, Report No 276, Transportation Research Board(TRB), National Cooperative Highway Research , Washington, D.C.
[9]. Priestly, M.J.N(1978), “ Design of Concrete Bridges for Temperature Gradients”, ACI Journal , pp: 209-217
[10]. Flaga (2001) “Application of Composite Structures in Bridge Engineering. ” Civil And Environmental Engineering Reports, Volume 15, Issue 4, pp.57-8
[11]. Mirambell and Agaudo,( 1990) “Temperature and Stress Distributions in Concrete Box Girder Bridges” Journal of structural Engineering Volume 116 Issue-9 September 1990

Vishnu Sharma, Dr A. K. Dwivedi ““Effect of Temperature Stresses in Composite Girder Bridges” ” International Journal of Research and Scientific Innovation (IJRSI) vol.5 issue 8, pp. 97-101 August 2018 URL: http://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijrsi/digital-library/volume-5-issue-8/97-101.pdf

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Improving the Service Level with Special Reference to Third Party Logistics Service
Subhodeep Mukherjee, Manish Mohan Baral – August 2018 – Page No.: 102-105

Third party logistics (3PL) is a business dynamic of developing significance everywhere throughout the world. In any case, it is at an incredibly starting stage in India, anyway some family unit and multinational associations are attempting to develop themselves in this section.This paper focuses on problems faced by a 3 PL logistics company in its day to day operations and its solutions. It reveals around the major problem faced like 100% delivery is not achieved due to lack of vehicles, lengthy process flow of the materials, greater involvement of human being and lack of automation in the process. So major focus will on improving the some of the factors like how to reduce the waiting duration of the vehicles, process modification for both inbound and outbound logistics which will reduce the loading and unloading duration and in turn delivery time. And also how to reduce the inventory management duration and also duration for picking up the materials for the specified location by modifying the process flow. If all this constraints are improved then 100 % delivery can be achieved. .

Page(s): 102-105                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 29 August 2018

 Subhodeep Mukherjee
Department of Management, Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra, Ranchi, Jharkhand, India

 Manish Mohan Baral
Department of Management, Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra, Ranchi, Jharkhand, India

[1]. Lieb, R.C. (1992), “The use of third party logistics services by large American manufacturers”, Journal of Business Logistics, Vol. 13 No. 2, pp. 29-42.
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[3]. Razzaque, M.A. and Sheng, C.C. (1998), “Outsourcing of logistics function: a literature survey”, International Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics Management, Vol. 28 No. 2, pp. 89- 107.
[4]. Lieb, R.C., Miller, R.A. and Wassenhove, L.N.V. (1993), “Third party logistics services: a comparison of experienced American and European manufacturers”, International Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics Management, Vol. 23 No. 6, pp. 35-44.
[5]. Bloomen, D.R.V. and Petrov, I.P. (1994), “Logistics in Bulgaria: Concepts for New market Expansion”, International Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics Management, Vol. 24 No. 2, pp. 30-36.
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[7]. Dapiran, P., Lieb, R., Millen, R. and Sohal, A. (1996), “Third party logistics services usage by large Australian firms”, International Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics Management, Vol. 26 No. 10, pp. 36-45.
[8]. Kim, Jae-II (1996), “Logistics in Korea: current state and future directions”, International Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics Management, Vol. 26 No. 10, pp. 6-21.
[9]. Millen, R. and Sohal, A. (1996), “Current logistics practices in the Asia Pacific region”, International Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics Management, Vol. 26 No. 10.
[10]. Bhatnagar, R., Sohal, A.S. and Millen, R. (1999), “Third party logistics services: a Singapore perspective”, International Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics Management, Vol. 29 No. 9, pp. 569-587.
[11]. Goh, M. and Ang, A. (2000), “Some logistics realities in Indochina”, International Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics Management, Vol. 30 No. 10, pp. 887-911.
[12]. Lieb, R.C., Miller, R.A. and Wassenhove, L.N.V. (1993), “Third party logistics services: a comparison of experienced American and European manufacturers”, International Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics Management, Vol. 23 No. 6, pp. 35-44.
[13]. Bask, A.H., 2001. Relationships among TPL providers and members of supply chains—A strategic perspective. Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing 16 (6), 470–486.
[14]. Cooper, J.C. (1993), “Logistics strategies for global businesses”, International Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics Management, Vol. 23 No. 4, pp. 12-23.
[15]. Trunick, P.A. (1989), “Outsourcing: a single source for many talents”, Transportation and Distribution, July, pp. 20-23.
[16]. Sahay, B.S., and Mohan, R. (2003), “Supply chain management practices in Indian industry”, International Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics Management, Vol. 33 No. 7, pp. 582-606.
[17]. Lieb, R.C., Miller, R.A. and Wassenhove, L.N.V. (1993), “Third party logistics services: a comparison of experienced American and European manufacturers”, International Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics Management, Vol. 23 No. 6, pp. 35-44.

Subhodeep Mukherjee, Manish Mohan Baral “Improving the Service Level with Special Reference to Third Party Logistics Service” International Journal of Research and Scientific Innovation (IJRSI) vol.5 issue 8, pp.102-105 August 2018 URL: http://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijrsi/digital-library/volume-5-issue-8/102-105.pdf

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Performance Analysis of Triple Concentric Tube Heat Exchanger with Ribs
Manish Kumar Singh, Pushpendra Kumar Jain – August 2018 – Page No.: 106-109

Present study includes the performance analysis of triple concentric tube heat exchanger with ribs using ANSYS Fluent 15. Water is used as working fluid. The inner most tube provides passage for the flow of water at room temperature. The intermediate tube encloses the innermost tube and also provides passage for hot water. The outermost tube encloses both the tubes and also provides passage for cold water. This arrangement is called N-H-C arrangement and the flow of all fluid is co-current. The intermediate tube consists of ribs having length of 4 mm and 8 mm and a width of 1 mm. The results are presented in the form of temperature at the inlet and outlet of tube and also the effectiveness of heat exchanger with and without ribs are shown. The result obtained is better with 8 mm rib.

Page(s): 106-109                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 02 September 2018

 Manish Kumar Singh
M. Tech Thermal, Department of Mechanical Engineering, SIRT Bhopal, India

 Pushpendra Kumar Jain
Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, SIRT Bhopal, India

[1] G.A.Quadir, N. J. Salman Ahmed, Irfan Anjum Badruddin, (2013), Experimental investigation of the performance of a triple concentric pipe heat exchanger, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, 62, 2014, 562-566.
[2] M.Sahoo, V.M. Behera, S.N.Das, H.C.Das, (2016) “Experimental investigation and performance analysis of triple concentric helical tube heat exchanger” International Journal of Engineering and Technology (IJET) Vol 8 No 5 Oct-Nov 2016.
[3] Dilpak Saurabh P., Harshal Khond and Mandar M. Lele , (2016) CFD Analysis of a Triple Concentric Tube Heat Exchanger having water flowing at three different temperatures INPRESSCO IJCET Special Issue-4 (March 2016)
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[5] Mr. Ganesh V. Wafelkar , Dr. L. V. Kamble “Experimental performance analysis of triple tube heat exchanger with dimple tubing ” INPRESSCO IJCET Special Issue-5 (June 2016)
[6] Tejas M. Ghiwala, Dr. V. K. Matawala, (2014), Sizing of triple concentric pipe heat exchanger, International Journal of Engineering Development and Research, 02, 1683-1692
[7] D.P.Sekulic, R.K.Shah, “Thermal design theory of three fluid heat exchangers”, Advances in Heat Transfer, 1995, 26, 219-328.
[8] G.A.Quadir, N.J.Salman Ahmed, Irfan Anjum Badruddin, (2014) Numerical investigation of the performance of a triple concentric pipe heat exchanger
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[10] Ahmet Unal, “Theoretical analysis of triple concentric-tube heat exchanger Part-2 Case studies”, International Communication Heat Mass Transfer, 2001, 28, 243-256.
[11] M. Suresh , Bhaarath Ramesh and S. P. Anand (2017) “Heat Transfer Enhancement Studies in a Concentric Tube Heat Exchanger” Journal of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences ISSN: 0974-2115
[12] Shekhar S. Babar, Kiran D. Devade (2015), Heat Transfer Enhancement in Pipe in Pipe Heat Exchanger with Swirling Flow: Review, International Journal for Scientific Research & Development, Vol.3, 3, 990-995.
[13] Ediz Batmaz, K.P.Sandeep, “Calculation of overall heat transfer coefficients in a triple tube heat exchangers”, Heat Mass Transfer, 2005, 41, 271-279
[14] O. Garcia-valladares ,“Numerical simulation of triple concentric pipe heat exchangers”, International Journal of Thermal sciences, 2004, 43, 979-991
[15] P. Nema, A.K. Datta, Improved milk fouling simulation in a helical triple tube heat exchanger, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 49 (Sep 2006) 3360–3370.

Manish Kumar Singh, Pushpendra Kumar Jain “Performance Analysis of Triple Concentric Tube Heat Exchanger with Ribs” International Journal of Research and Scientific Innovation (IJRSI) vol.5 issue 8, pp.106-109 August 2018 URL: http://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijrsi/digital-library/volume-5-issue-8/106-109.pdf

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A Study of Job Satisfaction among the Employees of Urban Cooperative Banks in Pune City
Rohit Madhukar Panhale – August 2018 – Page No.: 110-115

I. INTRODUCTION

The performance of an organisation depends on the level of satisfaction of its employees .A job not only provides a status to the employee but also binds him to the organisation. The concept of job satisfaction is quite significant in the context of employee morale. A person having high level of job satisfaction tends to have positive attitude towards his job and also enjoys life satisfaction. In order to increase efficiency and productivity of the organisation, positive attitude and job satisfaction of the employee is necessary. However employees as human beings are very complex and dynamic in nature, subject to a wide variety of physical, psychological and sociological needs along with their survival needs. Hence leading organisations prefer to conduct job satisfaction surveys frequently and try to maintain higher level of job satisfaction of their employees.

Page(s): 110-115                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 September 2018

 Rohit Madhukar Panhale
Pacific Academy of Higher Education & Research University, Udaipur, Rajasthan, India

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Rohit Madhukar Panhale “A Study of Job Satisfaction among the Employees of Urban Cooperative Banks in Pune City” International Journal of Research and Scientific Innovation (IJRSI) vol.5 issue 8, pp.110-115 August 2018 URL: http://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijrsi/digital-library/volume-5-issue-8/110-115.pdf

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Problems and Prospects of Indian IT Industry
Rohit Madhukar Panhale – August 2018 – Page No.: 116-119

I. INTRODUCTION

Information technology [IT] includes those forms of technology which are mainly used for creation, storage, exchange and using of Information in various forms like business data, motion pictures still images, voice conversations, multimedia presentations etc. It fact IT has led to the ‘’Information Revolution‘’, so that 21st century has been characterised by application are advancement in Information technology ; Now IT has become an integral part of our daily life. According to Information technology Association of America, IT is defined as ‘’the study, design, development—application, implementation, support or management of computer based information systems.’’ Advancement and application of IT has been rapidly progressing resulting in to development of cloud computing ,mobile application, revolution in uses interfaces, analytics etc. Thus it can be said that the influence of IT has been growing continuously and it will contribute significantly towards servicing customers by the business units in a better way.

Page(s): 116-119                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 04 September 2018

 Rohit Madhukar Panhale
Pacific Academy of Higher Education & Research University, Udaipur, Rajasthan, India

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Rohit Madhukar Panhale “Problems and Prospects of Indian IT Industry” International Journal of Research and Scientific Innovation (IJRSI) vol.5 issue 8, pp. 116-119 August 2018 URL: http://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijrsi/digital-library/volume-5-issue-8/116-119.pdf

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Value Added Reading: Panacea for Corruption among Public and Civil Service Employees in Nigeria
Prof. Abam Arikpo – August 2018 – Page No.: 120-128

It is common, today, in Nigeria to have corruption reported of public and civil servants. In fact, one is said to have good public or civil service employment only when there are lapses that allow him dupe the government and the public where he works. Despite measures by the three tiers of government, the practice has persisted. Thus, this paper seeks to advocate and discuss valued added reading as the most probable check.

Page(s): 120-128                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 05 September 2018

 Prof. Abam Arikpo
Department of Curriculum and Teaching, Faculty of Education, University of Calabar, Calabar, Nigeria

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Prof. Abam Arikpo “Value Added Reading: Panacea for Corruption among Public and Civil Service Employees in Nigeria” International Journal of Research and Scientific Innovation (IJRSI) vol.5 issue 8, pp.120-128 August 2018 URL: http://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijrsi/digital-library/volume-5-issue-8/120-128.pdf

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Softboard as a Novel Wood Fibre-Based Substrate for Hydroponic Systems – A Preliminary Study
E Sreenivasan – August 2018 – Page No.: 129-131

Hydroponics or the soilless cultivation is a popular and fast growing sector of agriculture and it has many advantages over soil-based system. It offers opportunities to provide optimal conditions for plant growth and therefore higher yields can be obtained compared to open field cultivation. In the aggregate system of hydroponics, different substrates are currently being used as support to the root system of plants under soilless cultivation. Substrates can be organic such as peat, pine bark, sawdust, rice hulls, etc. They can be petroleum based such as polymeric foams or plastic beads or they can be inorganic mineral based such as sand, gravel, perlite and stone wool. There are reasons for using substrates to support the root system. An effective substrate should possess certain qualities. Still works are underway to find more suitable ones having several advantages over the existing ones.
The present studies were undertaken with the objective of establishing the suitability of Softboard, a commercial Low Density Fibreboard product, manufactured from locally available hardwood fibres, as a suitable substrate for seed germination and seedling growth of two vegetable crops, Green gram (Phaseolus aureus) and Fenugreek(Trigonella foenum-graecum). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a novel hydroponic substrate based on hardwood fibres could perform similarly to the existing materials. During this work, the author has compared the results obtained using the softboard with that of two commonly used substrates i.e., coirpith and sawdust. The article has also attempted to highlight all the advantages of this novel growing medium when compared to the known items.

Page(s): 129-131                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 06 September 2018

 E Sreenivasan
R & D Division, The Western India Plywoods Ltd, Baliapatam, Kannur 670010, Kerala, India

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E Sreenivasan “Softboard as a Novel Wood Fibre-Based Substrate for Hydroponic Systems – A Preliminary Study” International Journal of Research and Scientific Innovation (IJRSI) vol.5 issue 8, pp.129-131 August 2018 URL: http://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijrsi/digital-library/volume-5-issue-8/129-131.pdf

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Hepatoprotective Activity of Carica Papaya and Ficus Bengalensis Latex against Paracetamol Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats
Yogendra Kumar, Girendra Gautam, Pushpesh Kumar Mishra – August 2018 – Page No.: 132-136

Objectives: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective activity of Carica Papaya latex and Ficus bangelensis latex against Paracetamol induced hepatotoxicity in rats.
Method: Paracetamol (3g/kg.b.w) was used to induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Salymarin (100mg/kg)was used as a standard drug for present study. Silymarin and Carica Papaya Latex at the dose 400mg/kg/b.w. per oral and Ficus bangelenesis latex at dose 300mg/kg/b.w. per oral were given for 10 days followed by single administration of Paracetamol 3mg/Kg b.w. per oral 1hour after Caraca Papaya Latex , Ficus Bengalasis and Silymarin administration for 10 days. On 10 days blood samples were collected from the animals for biochemical analysis and liver were subjected to histopathological examination.
Result and Discussion: The degree of protection was measured by using bio-chemical parameters like serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT), serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT), Bilirubin (BRN), Alkaline phosphate (ALP) and total protein. The decreased levels of SGOT, SGPT, ALP, Bilirubin and increased levels of total protein parameters in treated rats were an indication of the hepatoprotective activity of Carica papaya latex and Ficus bengalenesis latex. Silymarin (100 mg/kg) a well known hepatoprotective drug used for comparision exhibited significant activity (<0.05). Conclusion: The both plants latex were completely prevented the toxic effect of Paracetamol on the above serum parameter. Significant hepatoprotective activity of both plant latex were reported. Carica papaya latex was found to be more protective effect as compare to Ficus bengalenesis latex.

Page(s): 132-136                                                                                                                   Date of Publication: 10 September 2018

 Yogendra Kumar
Research Scholar, Faculty of Pharmacy, Bhagwant University, Sikar Road, Ajmer, Rajasthan, India

 Girendra Gautam
Faculty of Pharmacy, Bhagwant University, Sikar Road, Ajmer, Rajasthan, India

 Pushpesh Kumar Mishra
Faculty of Pharmacy, Bhagwant University, Sikar Road, Ajmer, Rajasthan, India

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Yogendra Kumar, Girendra Gautam, Pushpesh Kumar Mishra “Hepatoprotective Activity of Carica Papaya and Ficus Bengalensis Latex against Paracetamol Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats” International Journal of Research and Scientific Innovation (IJRSI) vol.5 issue 8, pp. 132-136 August 2018 URL: http://www.rsisinternational.org/journals/ijrsi/digital-library/volume-5-issue-8/132-136.pdf

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